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Archive for the ‘custodian-based retention’ Category

Breaking News: Court Clarifies Duty to Preserve Evidence, Denies eDiscovery Sanctions Motion Against Pfizer

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

It is fortunately becoming clearer that organizations do not need to preserve information until litigation is “reasonably anticipated.” In Brigham Young University v. Pfizer (D. Utah Apr. 16, 2012), the court denied the plaintiff university’s fourth motion for discovery sanctions against Pfizer, likely ending its chance to obtain a “game-ending” eDiscovery sanction. The case, which involves disputed claims over the discovery and development of prominent anti-inflammatory drugs, is set for trial on May 29, 2012.

In Brigham Young, the university pressed its case for sanctions against Pfizer based on a vastly expanded concept of a litigant’s preservation duty. Relying principally on the controversial Phillip M. Adams & Associates v. Dell case, the university argued that Pfizer’s “duty to preserve runs to the legal system generally.” The university reasoned that just as the defendant in the Adams case was “sensitized” by earlier industry lawsuits to the real possibility of plaintiff’s lawsuit, Pfizer was likewise put on notice of the university’s claims due to related industry litigation.

The court rejected such a sweeping characterization of the duty to preserve, opining that it was “simply too broad.” Echoing the concerns articulated by the Advisory Committee when it framed the 2006 amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP), the court took pains to emphasize the unreasonable burdens that parties such as Pfizer would face if such a duty were imposed:

“It is difficult for the Court to imagine how a party could ever dispose of information under such a broad duty because of the potential for some distantly related litigation that may arise years into the future.”

The court also rejected the university’s argument because such a position failed to appreciate the basic workings of corporate records retention policies. As the court reasoned, “[e]vidence may simply be discarded as a result of good faith business procedures.” When those procedures operate to inadvertently destroy evidence before the duty to preserve is triggered, the court held that sanctions should not issue: “The Federal Rules protect from sanctions those who lack control over the requested materials or who have discarded them as a result of good faith business procedures.”

The Brigham Young case is significant for a number of reasons. First, it reiterates that organizations need not keep electronically stored information (ESI) for legal or regulatory purposes until the duty to preserve is reasonably anticipated. As American courts have almost uniformly held since the 1997 case of Concord Boat Corp. v. Brunswick Corp., organizations are not required to keep every piece of paper, every email, every electronic document and every back up tape.

Second, Brigham Young emphasizes that organizations can and should use document retention protocols to rid themselves of data stockpiles. Absent a preservation duty or other exceptional circumstances, paring back ESI pursuant to “good faith business procedures” (such as a neutral retention policy) will be protected under the law.

Finally, Brigham Young narrows the holding of the Adams case to its particular facts. The Adams case has been particularly troublesome to organizations as it arguably expanded their preservation duty in certain circumstances. However, Brigham Young clarified that this expansion was unwarranted in the instant case, particularly given that Pfizer documents were destroyed pursuant to “good faith business procedures.”

In summary, Brigham Young teaches that organizations will be protected from eDiscovery sanctions to the extent they destroy ESI in good faith pursuant to a reasonable records retention policy. This will likely bring a sigh of relief to enterprises struggling with the information explosion since it encourages confident deletion of data when the coast is clear of a discrete litigation event.

Policy vs. Privacy: Striking the Right Balance Between Organization Interests and Employee Privacy

Friday, March 9th, 2012

The lines between professional and personal lives are being further blurred every day. With the proliferation of smart phones, the growth of the virtual workplace and the demands of business extending into all hours of the day, employees now routinely mix business with pleasure by commingling such matters on their work and personal devices. This trend is sure to increase, particularly with “bring your own device” policies now finding their way into companies.

This sometimes awkward marriage of personal and professional issues raises the critical question of how organizations can respect the privacy rights of their employees while also protecting their trade secrets and other confidential/proprietary information. The ability to properly navigate these murky waters under the broader umbrella of information governance may be the difference between a successful business and a litigation-riddled enterprise.

Take, for instance, a recent lawsuit that claimed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) unlawfully spied on the personal email accounts of nine of its employee scientists and doctors. In that litigation, the FDA is alleged to have monitored email messages those employees sent to Congress and the Office of Inspector of General for the Department of Health & Human Services. In the emails at issue, the scientists and doctors scrutinized the effectiveness of certain medical devices the FDA was about to approve for use on patients.

While the FDA’s email policy clearly delineates that employee communications made from government devices may be monitored or recorded, the FDA may have intercepted employees’ user IDs and passwords and accessed messages they sent from their home computers and personal smart phones. Not only would such conduct potentially violate the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), it might also conceivably run afoul of the Whistleblower Protection Act.

The FDA spying allegations have also resulted in a congressional inquiry into the email monitoring policies of all federal agencies throughout the executive branch. Congress is now requesting that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) produce the following information about agency email monitoring policies:

  • Whether a policy distinguishes between work and personal email
  • Whether user IDs and passwords can be obtained for personal email accounts and, if so, whether safeguards are deployed to prevent misappropriation
  • Whether a policy defines what constitutes protected whistleblower communications

The congressional inquiry surrounding agency email practices provides a valuable measuring stick for how private sector organizations are addressing related issues. For example, does an organization have an acceptable use policy that addresses employee privacy rights? Having such a policy in place is particularly critical given that employees use company-issued smart phones to send out work emails, take photographs and post content to personal social networking pages. If such a policy exists now, query whether it is enforced, what the mechanisms exist for doing so and whether or not such enforcement is transparent to the employees.  Compliance is just as important as issuing the policy in the first place.

Another critical inquiry is whether an organization has an audit/oversight process to prevent the type of abuses that allegedly occurred at the FDA. Such a process is essential for organizations on multiple levels. First, as Congress made clear in its letter to the OMB, monitoring communications that employees make from their personal devices violates the ECPA. It could also interfere with internal company whistleblower processes. And to the extent adverse employment action is taken against an employee-turned-whistleblower, the organization could be liable for violations of the False Claims Act or the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

A related aspect to these issues concerns whether an organization can obtain work communications sent from employee personal devices. For example, financial services companies must typically retain communications with investors for at least three years. Has the organization addressed this document retention issue while respecting employee privacy rights in their own smart phones and tablet computers?

If an organization does not have such policies or protections in place, it should not panic and rush off to get policies drafted without thinking ahead. Instead, it should address these issues through an intelligent information governance plan. Such a plan will typically address issues surrounding information security, employee privacy, data retention and eDiscovery within the larger context of industry regulations, business demands and employee productivity. That plan will also include budget allocations to support the acquisition and deployment of technology tools to support written policies on these and other issues.  Addressed in this context, organizations will more likely strike the right balance between their interests and their employees’ privacy and thereby avoid a host of unpleasant outcomes.

Breaking News: Federal Circuit Denies Google’s eDiscovery Mandamus Petition

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit dealt Google a devastating blow Monday in connection with Oracle America’s patent and copyright infringement suit against Google involving features of Java and Android. The Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s order that a key email was not entitled to protection under the attorney-client privilege.

Google had argued that the email was privileged under Upjohn Co. v. United States, asserting that the message reflected discussions about litigation strategy between a company engineer and in-house counsel. While acknowledging that Upjohn would protect such discussions, the court rejected that characterization of the email.  Instead, the court held that the email reflected a tactical discussion about “negotiation strategy” with Google management, not an “infringement or invalidity analysis” with Google counsel.

Getting beyond the core privilege issues, Google might have avoided this dispute had it withheld the eight earlier drafts of the email that it produced to Oracle. As we discussed in our previous post, organizations conducting privilege reviews should consider using robust, next generation eDiscovery technology such as email analytical software, that could have isolated the drafts and potentially removed them from production. Other technological capabilities, such as Near Duplicate Identification, could also have helped identify draft materials and marry them up with finals marked as privileged. As this case shows, in the fast moving era of eDiscovery, having the right technology is essential for maintaining a strategic advantage in litigation.

The Social Media Rubik’s Cube: FINRA Solved it First, Are Non-Regulated Industries Next?

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

It’s no surprise that the first industry to be heavily regulated regarding social media use was the financial services industry. The predominant factor that drove regulators to address the viral qualities of social media was the fiduciary nature of investing that accompanies securities, coupled with the potential detrimental financial impact these offerings could have on investors.

Although there is no explicit language in FINRA’s Regulatory Notices 10-06 (January 2010) or 11-30 (August 2011) requiring archival, the record keeping component of the notices necessitate social media archiving in most cases due to the sheer volume of data produced on social media sites. Melanie Kalemba, Vice President of Business Development at SocialWare in Austin, Texas states:

“Our clients in the financial industry have led the way, they have paved the road for other industries, making social media usage less daunting. Best practices for monitoring third-party content, record keeping responsibilities, and compliance programs are available and developed for other industries to learn from. The template is made.”

eDiscovery and Privacy Implications. Privacy laws are an important aspect of social media use that impact discoverability. Discovery and privacy represent layers of the Rubik’s cube in the ever-changing and complex social media environment. No longer are social media cases only personal injury suits or HR incidents, although those are plentiful. For example, in Largent v. Reed the court ruled that information posted by a party on their personal Facebook page was discoverable and ordered the plaintiff to provide user name and password to enable the production of the information. In granting the motion to compel the Defendant’s login credentials, Judge Walsh acknowledged that Facebook has privacy settings, and that users must take “affirmative steps” to keep their information private. However, his ruling determined that no social media privacy privilege exists: “No court has recognized such a privilege, and neither will we.” He further reiterated his ruling by adding, “[o]nly the uninitiated or foolish could believe that Facebook is an online lockbox of secrets.”

Then there are the new cases emerging over social media account ownership which affect privacy and discoverability. In the recently filed Phonedog v. Kravitz, 11-03474 (N.D. Cal.; Nov. 8, 2011), the lines between the “professional” versus the “private” user are becoming increasingly blurred. This case also raises questions about proprietary client lists, valuations on followers, and trade secrets  – all of which are further complicated when there is no social media policy in place. The financial services industry has been successful in implementing effective social media policies along with technology to comply with agency mandates – not only because they were forced to by regulation, but because they have developed best practices that essentially incorporate social media into their document retention policies and information governance infrastructures.

Regulatory Framework. Adding another Rubik’s layer are the multitude of regulatory and compliance issues that many industries face. The most active and vocal regulators for guidance in the US on social media have been FINRA, the SEC and the FTC. FINRA initiated guidance to the financial services industry, and earlier this month the SEC issued their alert. The SEC’s exam alert to registered investment advisers issued on January 4, 2012 was not meant to be a comprehensive summary for compliance related to the use of social media. Instead, it lays out staff observations of three major categories: third party content, record keeping and compliance – expounding on FINRA’s notice.

Last year the FTC issued an extremely well done Preliminary FTC Staff Report on Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: A Proposed Framework for Businesses and Policymakers.  Three main components are central to the report. The first is a call for all companies to build privacy and security mechanisms into new products – considering the possible negative ramifications at the outset, avoiding social media and privacy issues as an afterthought. The FTC has cleverly coined the notion, “Privacy by Design.” Second, “Just-In-Time” is a concept about notice and encourages companies to communicate with the public in a simple way that prompts them to make informed decisions about their data in terms that are clear and that require an affirmative action (i.e., checking a box). Finally, the FTC calls for greater transparency around data collection, use and retention. The FTC asserts that consumers have a right to know what kind of data companies collect, and should have access to the sensitivity and intended use of that data. The FTC’s report is intended to inform policymakers, including Congress, as they legislate on privacy – and to motivate companies to self-regulate and develop best practices. 

David Shonka, Principal Deputy General Counsel at the FTC in Washington, D.C., warns, “There is a real tension between the situations where a company needs to collect data about a transaction versus the liabilities associated with keeping unneeded data due to privacy concerns. Generally, archiving everything is a mistake.” Shonka arguably reinforces the case for instituting an intelligent archive, whether a company is regulated or not;  an archive that is selective about what it ingests based on content, and that has an appropriate deletion cycle applied to defined data types/content according to a policy. This will ensure expiry of private consumer information in a timely manner, but retains the benefits of retrieval for a defined period if necessary.

The Non-Regulated Use Case­. When will comprehensive social media policies, retention and monitoring become more prevalent in the non-regulated sectors? In the case of FINRA and the SEC, regulations were issued to the financial industry. In the case of the FTC, guidance had been given to companies regarding how to avoid false advertisement and protect consumer privacy. The two are not dissimilar in effect. Both require a social media policy, monitoring, auditing, technology, and training. While there is no clear mandate to archive social media if you are in a non-regulated industry, this can’t be too far away. This is evidenced by companies that have already implemented social media monitoring systems for reasons like brand promotion/protection, or healthcare companies that deal with highly sensitive information. If social media is replacing email, and social media is essentially another form of electronic evidence, why would social media not be part of the integral document retention/expiry procedures within an organization?

Content-based monitoring and archiving is possible with technology available today, as the financial sector has demonstrated. Debbi Corej, who is a compliance expert for the financial sector and has successfully implemented an intensive social media program, says it perfectly: “How do you get to yes? Yes you can use social media, but in a compliant way.” The answer can be found at LegalTech New YorkJanuary 30 @ 2:00pm.

Losing Weight, Developing an Information Governance Plan, and Other New Year’s Resolutions

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

It’s already a few weeks into the new year and it’s easy to spot the big lines at the gym, folks working on fad diets and many swearing off any number of vices.  Sadly perhaps, most popular resolutions don’t even really change year after year.  In the corporate world, though, it’s not good enough to simply recycle resolutions every year since there’s a lot more at stake, often with employee’s bonuses and jobs hanging in the balance.

It’s not too late to make information governance part of the corporate 2012 resolution list.  The reason is pretty simple – most companies need to get out of the reactive firefighting of eDiscovery given the risks of sloppy work, inadvertent productions and looming sanctions.  Yet, so many are caught up in the fog of eDiscovery war that they’ve failed to see the nexus between the upstream, proactive good data management hygiene and the downstream eDiscovery chaos.

In many cases the root cause is the disconnect between differing functional groups (Legal, IT, Information Security, Records Management, etc.).  This is where the emerging umbrella concept of Information Governance comes to play, serving as a way to tackle these information risks along a unified front. Gartner defines information governanceas the:

“specification of decision rights, and an accountability framework to encourage desirable behavior in the valuation, creation, storage, use, archiving and deletion of information, … [including] the processes, roles, standards, and metrics that ensure the effective and efficient use of information to enable an organization to achieve its goals.”

Perhaps more simply put, what were once a number of distinct disciplines—records management, data privacy, information security and eDiscovery—are rapidly coming together in ways that are important to those concerned with mitigating and managing information risk. This new information governance landscape is comprised of a number of formerly discrete categories:

  • Regulatory Risks – Whether an organization is in a heavily regulated vertical or not, there are a host of regulations that an organization must navigate to successfully stay in compliance.  In the United States these include a range of disparate regimes, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, HIPPA, the Securities and Exchange Act, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and other specialized regulations – any number of which require information to be kept in a prescribed fashion, for specified periods of time.  Failure to turn over information when requested by regulators can have dramatic financial consequences, as well as negative impacts to an organization’s reputation.
  • Discovery Risks – Under the discovery realm there are any number of potential risks as a company moves along the EDRM spectrum (i.e., Identification, Preservation, Collection, Processing, Analysis, Review and Production), but the most lethal risk is typically associated with spoliation sanctions that arise from the failure to adequately preserve electronically stored information (ESI).  There have been literally hundreds of cases where both plaintiffs and defendants have been caught in the judicial crosshairs, resulting in penalties ranging from outright case dismissal to monetary sanctions in the millions of dollars, simply for failing to preserve data properly.  It is in this discovery arena that the failure to dispose of corporate information, where possible, rears its ugly head since the eDiscovery burden is commensurate with the amount of data that needs to be preserved, processed and reviewed.  Some statistics show that it can cost as much as $5 per document just to have an attorney privilege review performed.  And, with every gigabyte containing upwards of 75,000 pages, it is easy to see massive discovery liability when an organization has terabytes and even petabytes of extraneous data lying around.
  • Privacy Risks – Even though the US has a relatively lax information privacy climate there are any number of laws that require companies to notify customers if their personally identifiable information (PII) such as credit card, social security, or credit numbers have been compromised.  For example, California’s data breach notification law (SB1386) mandates that all subject companies must provide notification if there is a security breach to the electronic database containing PII of any California resident.  It is easy to see how unmanaged PII can increase corporate risk, especially as data moves beyond US borders to the international stage where privacy regimes are much more staunch.
  • Information Security Risks Data breaches have become so commonplace that the loss/theft of intellectual property has become an issue for every company, small and large, both domestically and internationally.  The cost to businesses of unintentionally exposing corporate information climbed 7 percent last year to over $7 million per incident.  Recently senators asked the SEC to “issue guidance regarding disclosure of information security risk, including material network breaches” since “securities law obligates the disclosure of any material network breach, including breaches involving sensitive corporate information that could be used by an adversary to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace, affect corporate earnings, and potentially reduce market share.”  The senators cited a 2009 survey that concluded that 38% of Fortune 500 companies made a “significant oversight” by not mentioning data security exposures in their public filings.

Information governance as an umbrella concept helps organizations to create better alignment between functional groups as they attempt to solve these complex and interrelated data risk challenges.  This coordination is even more critical given the way that corporate data is proliferating and migrating beyond the firewall.  With even more data located in the cloud and on mobile devices a key mandate is managing data in all types of form factors. A great first step is to determine ownership of a consolidated information governance approach where the owner can:

  • Get C-Level buy-in
  • Have the organizational savvy to obtain budget
  • Be able to define “reasonable” information governance efforts, which requires both legal and IT input
  • Have strong leadership and consensus building skills, because all stakeholders need to be on the same page
  • Understand the nuances of their business, since an overly rigid process will cause employees to work around the policies and procedures

Next, tap into and then leverage IT or information security budgets for archiving, compliance and storage.  In most progressive organizations there are likely ongoing projects that can be successfully massaged into a larger information governance play.  A great place to focus on initially is information archiving, since this one of the simplest steps an organization can take to improve their information governance hygiene.  With an archive organizations can systematically index, classify and retain information and thus establish a proactive approach to data management.  It’s this ability to apply retention and (most importantly) expiration policies that allows organizations to start reducing the upstream data deluge that will inevitably impact downstream eDiscovery processes.

Once an archive is in place, the next logical step is to couple a scalable, reactive eDiscovery process with the upstream data sources, which will axiomatically include email, but increasingly should encompass cloud content, social media, unstructured data, etc.  It is important to make sure  that a given  archive has been tested to ensure compatibility with the chosen eDiscovery application to guarantee that it can collect content at scale in the same manner used to collect from other data sources.  Overlaying both of these foundational pieces should be the ability to place content on legal hold, whether that content exists in the archive or not.

As we enter 2012, there is no doubt that information governance should be an element in building an enterprise’s information architecture.  And, different from fleeting weight loss resolutions, savvy organizations should vow to get ahead of the burgeoning categories of information risk by fully embracing their commitment to integrated information governance.  And yet, this resolution doesn’t need to encompass every possible element of information governance.  Instead, it’s best to put foundational pieces into place and then build the rest of the infrastructure in methodical and modular fashion.

Lessons Learned for 2012: Spotlighting the Top eDiscovery Cases from 2011

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

The New Year has now dawned and with it, the certainty that 2012 will bring new developments to the world of eDiscovery.  Last month, we spotlighted some eDiscovery trends for 2012 that we feel certain will occur in the near term.  To understand how these trends will play out, it is instructive to review some of the top eDiscovery cases from 2011.  These decisions provide a roadmap of best practices that the courts promulgated last year.  They also spotlight the expectations that courts will likely have for organizations in 2012 and beyond.

Issuing a Timely and Comprehensive Litigation Hold

Case: E.I. du Pont de Nemours v. Kolon Industries (E.D. Va. July 21, 2011)

Summary: The court issued a stiff rebuke against defendant Kolon Industries for failing to issue a timely and proper litigation hold.  That rebuke came in the form of an instruction to the jury that Kolon executives and employees destroyed key evidence after the company’s preservation duty was triggered.  The jury responded by returning a stunning $919 million verdict for DuPont.

The spoliation at issue occurred when several Kolon executives and employees deleted thousands emails and other records relevant to DuPont’s trade secret claims.  The court laid the blame for this destruction on the company’s attorneys and executives, reasoning they could have prevented the spoliation through an effective litigation hold process.  At issue were three hold notices circulated to the key players and data sources.  The notices were all deficient in some manner.  They were either too limited in their distribution, ineffective since they were prepared in English for Korean-speaking employees, or too late to prevent or otherwise ameliorate the spoliation.

The Lessons for 2012: The DuPont case underscores the importance of issuing a timely and comprehensive litigation hold notice.  As DuPont teaches, organizations should identify what key players and data sources may have relevant information.  A comprehensive notice should then be prepared to communicate the precise hold instructions in an intelligible fashion.  Finally, the hold should be circulated immediately to prevent data loss.

Organizations should also consider deploying the latest technologies to help effectuate this process.  This includes an eDiscovery platform that enables automated legal hold acknowledgements.  Such technology will allow custodians to be promptly and properly apprised of litigation and thereby retain information that might otherwise have been discarded.

Another Must-Read Case: Haraburda v. Arcelor Mittal U.S.A., Inc. (D. Ind. June 28, 2011)

Suspending Document Retention Policies

Case: Viramontes v. U.S. Bancorp (N.D. Ill. Jan. 27, 2011)

Summary: The defendant bank defeated a sanctions motion because it modified aspects of its email retention policy once it was aware litigation was reasonably foreseeable.  The bank implemented a retention policy that kept emails for 90 days, after which the emails were overwritten and destroyed.  The bank also promulgated a course of action whereby the retention policy would be promptly suspended on the occurrence of litigation or other triggering event.  This way, the bank could establish the reasonableness of its policy in litigation.  Because the bank followed that procedure in good faith, it was protected from court sanctions under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure 37(e) “safe harbor.”

The Lesson for 2012: As Viramontes shows, an organization can be prepared for eDiscovery disputes by timely suspending aspects of its document retention policies.  By modifying retention policies when so required, an organization can develop a defensible retention procedure and be protected from court sanctions under Rule 37(e).

Coupling those procedures with archiving software will only enhance an organization’s eDiscovery preparations.  Effective archiving software will have a litigation hold mechanism, which enables an organization to suspend automated retention rules.  This will better ensure that data subject to a preservation duty is actually retained.

Another Must-Read Case: Micron Technology, Inc. v. Rambus Inc., 645 F.3d 1311 (Fed. Cir. 2011)

Managing the Document Collection Process

Case: Northington v. H & M International (N.D.Ill. Jan. 12, 2011)

Summary: The court issued an adverse inference jury instruction against a company that destroyed relevant emails and other data.  The spoliation occurred in large part because legal and IT were not involved in the collection process.  For example, counsel was not actively engaged in the critical steps of preservation, identification or collection of electronically stored information (ESI).  Nor was IT brought into the picture until 15 months after the preservation duty was triggered. By that time, rank and file employees – some of whom were accused by the plaintiff of harassment – stepped into this vacuum and conducted the collection process without meaningful oversight.  Predictably, key documents were never found and the court had little choice but to promise to inform the jury that the company destroyed evidence.

The Lesson for 2012: An organization does not have to suffer the same fate as the company in the Northington case.  It can take charge of its data during litigation through cooperative governance between legal and IT.  After issuing a timely and effective litigation hold, legal should typically involve IT in the collection process.  Legal should rely on IT to help identify all data sources – servers, systems and custodians – that likely contain relevant information.  IT will also be instrumental in preserving and collecting that data for subsequent review and analysis by legal.  By working together in a top-down fashion, organizations can better ensure that their eDiscovery process is defensible and not fatally flawed.

Another Must-Read Case: Green v. Blitz U.S.A., Inc. (E.D. Tex. Mar. 1, 2011)

Using Proportionality to Dictate the Scope of Permissible Discovery

Case: DCG Systems v. Checkpoint Technologies (N.D. Ca. Nov. 2, 2011)

The court adopted the new Model Order on E-Discovery in Patent Cases recently promulgated by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  The model order incorporates principles of proportionality to reduce the production of email in patent litigation.  In adopting the order, the court explained that email productions should be scaled back since email is infrequently introduced as evidence at trial.  As a result, email production requests will be restricted to five search terms and may only span a defined set of five custodians.  Furthermore, email discovery in DCG Systems will wait until after the parties complete discovery on the “core documentation” concerning the patent, the accused product and prior art.

The Lesson for 2012: Courts seem to be slowly moving toward a system that incorporates proportionality as the touchstone for eDiscovery.  This is occurring beyond the field of patent litigation, as evidenced by other recent cases.  Even the State of Utah has gotten in on the act, revising its version of Rule 26 to require that all discovery meet the standards of proportionality.  While there are undoubtedly deviations from this trend (e.g., Pippins v. KPMG (S.D.N.Y. Oct. 7, 2011)), the clear lesson is that discovery should comply with the cost cutting mandate of Federal Rule 1.

Another Must-Read Case: Omni Laboratories Inc. v. Eden Energy Ltd [2011] EWHC 2169 (TCC) (29 July 2011)

Leveraging eDiscovery Technologies for Search and Review

Case: Oracle America v. Google (N.D. Ca. Oct. 20, 2011)

The court ordered Google to produce an email that it previously withheld on attorney client privilege grounds.  While the email’s focus on business negotiations vitiated Google’s claim of privilege, that claim was also undermined by Google’s production of eight earlier drafts of the email.  The drafts were produced because they did not contain addressees or the heading “attorney client privilege,” which the sender later inserted into the final email draft.  Because those details were absent from the earlier drafts, Google’s “electronic scanning mechanisms did not catch those drafts before production.”

The Lesson for 2012: Organizations need to leverage next generation, robust technology to support the document production process in discovery.  Tools such as email analytical software, which can isolate drafts and offer to remove them from production, are needed to address complex production issues.  Other technological capabilities, such as Near Duplicate Identification, can also help identify draft materials and marry them up with finals that have been marked as privileged.  Last but not least, technology assisted review has the potential of enabling one lawyer to efficiently complete the work that previously took thousands of hours.  Finding the budget and doing the research to obtain the right tools for the enterprise should be a priority for organizations in 2012.

Another Must-Read Case: J-M Manufacturing v. McDermott, Will & Emery (CA Super. Jun. 2, 2011)

Conclusion

There were any number of other significant cases from 2011 that could have made this list.  We invite you to share your favorites in the comments section or contact us directly with your feedback.

For more on the cases discussed above, watch this video:

Q&A with William P. Butterfield on his Testimony Regarding the Costs and Burdens of eDiscovery Before the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

William Butterfield is a partner at Hausfeld LLP with over 33 years of experience as a trial attorney and a track record of success.  In addition to serving as a leader in several legal think tanks and teaching law, Mr. Butterfield’s achievements include reaching multiple settlements in the neighborhood of $100 million in complex legal matters.  Last week Mr. Butterfield had the rare opportunity to testify before Congress regarding the Costs and Burdens of eDiscovery in Washington D.C.  The following dialogue captures his experiences and observations testifying before the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution.

Matthew Nelson: What was it like testifying before Congress and why did you feel compelled to testify?

William P. Butterfield: It was my first time testifying before Congress, so I wasn’t sure what to expect.  But it was a positive experience for me, and I’m glad that I was asked to testify.  While there is an organized, and well-financed effort by some in the corporate community to make drastic revisions to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, or civil rules, there is also a large segment of the bar (including many attorneys who are thought leaders in this area) who think that the types of “cures” under consideration will do more harm than good.  I think it’s important to give voice to that view, and that is why I testified.

Nelson: What were some of the key points you and other witnesses with different viewpoints made during the hearing?

Butterfield: Rebecca Kourlis, executive director of the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System (IAALS), testified that the cost of litigation is in part responsible for fewer trials.  She said that IAALS supports a three-pronged approach to address the problem:  1) More effective judicial case management, 2) Increased cooperation and 3) Rules revisions.  Importantly, Justice Kourlis said that we should defer to the Standing Committee and the Civil Rules Advisory Committee of the Judicial Conference, which is addressing the issues.

William Hubbard, assistant professor of law at the University of Chicago, testified about the costs of preservation and eDiscovery, noting that the costs are relatively modest in most cases.  He testified that most of the high discovery costs are occurring in a very few (5%) cases.

Thomas Hill, associate general counsel at General Electric, testified that the current Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP) result in American companies waste billions of dollars on unnecessary document preservation and production.  He indicated that part of the problem is that companies must preserve documents before a lawsuit is filed, and often they preserve where no lawsuit is ever filed.  He provided examples of occasions where GE spent more in preservation than the money at stake in the litigation.

My testimony focused on three things:  1) Our legal system depends on discovery and some of the proposals from those seeking drastic rules changes would undermine our goal of searching for the truth in litigation and resolving disputes on the merits; 2) The fear of sanctions that some companies claim are causing them to over-preserve is overblown, given that sanctions are sought in just 1/15th of 1% of federal court cases, and are granted in only about half of those cases; 3) A review of sanctions decisions demonstrates that parties are not getting sanctioned where they acted in good faith.  Rather, they are being sanctioned for egregious conduct.

Nelson: Did you sense a split among party lines or among certain members of Congress or some kind of overwhelming consensus on any issues?

Butterfield: Predictably, there appeared to be some differences between parties, although it is hard to say what reflects the views of Republicans on the committee, because only one of their members participated.  The Democrats expressed two general views:  1) Although eDiscovery presents challenges to litigants, it has been valuable in uncovering critical evidence and is very beneficial to the goals of discovery in general, 2) Congress should not interfere with the Rules Committee, which is carefully studying these issues.  The Republicans, represented by the Subcommittee Chair, Trent Franks, took the position that the current discovery rules do not promote the objectives of Rule 1, which provides that litigation should be just, speedy and inexpensive.  Franks said that the civil rules regarding preservation and spoliation sanctions are too vague, and parties are therefore required to preserve excessive amounts of information.  But despite those differences, I didn’t observe any member calling for congressional intervention at this time.

Nelson: What struck you as interesting or important and what do you expect will be the outcome or next steps for Congress?

Butterfield: What struck me as interesting (and surprising) was that only one member from the majority participated in the hearing.  Nothing during the hearing led me to believe that Congress would interfere with the Rules Committee’s work and process.

For those interested in hearing more, visit the United States Courts website to listen to a full recording of the hearing. To learn more about FRCP developments follow Matt Nelson on Twitter at @InfoGovlawer

Top Ten eDiscovery Predictions for 2012

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

As 2011 comes quickly to a close we’ve attempted, as in years past, to do our best Carnac impersonation and divine the future of eDiscovery.  Some of these predictions may happen more quickly than others, but it’s our sense that all will come to pass in the near future – it’s just a matter of timing.

  1. Technology Assisted Review (TAR) Gains Speed.  The area of Technology Assisted Review is very exciting since there are a host of emerging technologies that can help make the review process more efficient, ranging from email threading, concept search, clustering, predictive coding and the like.  There are two fundamental challenges however.  First, the technology doesn’t work in a vacuum, meaning that the workflows need to be properly designed and the users need to make accurate decisions because those judgment calls often are then magnified by the application.  Next, the defensibility of the given approach needs to be well vetted.  While it’s likely not necessary (or practical) to expect a judge to mandate the use of a specific technological approach, it is important for the applied technologies to be reasonable, transparent and auditable since the worst possible outcome would be to have a technology challenged and then find the producing party unable to adequately explain their methodology.
  2. The Custodian-Based Collection Model Comes Under Stress. Ever since the days of Zubulake, litigants have focused on “key players” as a proxy for finding relevant information during the eDiscovery process.  Early on, this model worked particularly well in an email-centric environment.  But, as discovery from cloud sources, collaborative worksites (like SharePoint) and other unstructured data repositories continues to become increasingly mainstream, the custodian-oriented collection model will become rapidly outmoded because it will fail to take into account topically-oriented searches.  This trend will be further amplified by the bench’s increasing distrust of manual, custodian-based data collection practices and the presence of better automated search methods, which are particularly valuable for certain types of litigation (e.g., patent disputes, product liability cases).
  3. The FRCP Amendment Debate Will Rage On – Unfortunately Without Much Near Term Progress. While it is clear that the eDiscovery preservation duty has become a more complex and risk laden process, it’s not clear that this “pain” is causally related to the FRCP.  In the notes from the Dallas mini-conference, a pending Sedona survey was quoted referencing the fact that preservation challenges were increasing dramatically.  Yet, there isn’t a consensus viewpoint regarding which changes, if any, would help improve the murky problem.  In the near term this means that organizations with significant preservation pains will need to better utilize the rules that are on the books and deploy enabling technologies where possible.
  4. Data Hoarding Increasingly Goes Out of Fashion. The war cry of many IT professionals that “storage is cheap” is starting to fall on deaf ears.  Organizations are realizing that the cost of storing information is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the litigation risk of having terabytes (and conceivably petabytes) of unstructured, uncategorized and unmanaged electronically stored information (ESI).  This tsunami of information will increasingly become an information liability for organizations that have never deleted a byte of information.  In 2012, more corporations will see the need to clean out their digital houses and will realize that such cleansing (where permitted) is a best practice moving forward.  This applies with equal force to the US government, which has recently mandated such an effort at President Obama’s behest.
  5. Information Governance Becomes a Viable Reality.  For several years there’s been an effort to combine the reactive (far right) side of the EDRM with the logically connected proactive (far left) side of the EDRM.  But now, a number of surveys have linked good information governance hygiene with better response times to eDiscovery requests and governmental inquires, as well as a corresponding lower chance of being sanctioned and the ability to turn over less responsive information.  In 2012, enterprises will realize that the litigation use case is just one way to leverage archival and eDiscovery tools, further accelerating adoption.
  6. Backup Tapes Will Be Increasingly Seen as a Liability.  Using backup tapes for disaster recovery/business continuity purposes remains a viable business strategy, although backing up to tape will become less prevalent as cloud backup increases.  However, if tapes are kept around longer than necessary (days versus months) then they become a ticking time bomb when a litigation or inquiry event crops up.
  7. International eDiscovery/eDisclosure Processes Will Continue to Mature. It’s easy to think of the US as dominating the eDiscovery landscape. While this is gospel for us here in the States, international markets are developing quickly and in many ways are ahead of the US, particularly with regulatory compliance-driven use cases, like the UK Bribery Act 2010.  This fact, coupled with the menagerie of international privacy laws, means we’ll be less Balkanized in our eDiscovery efforts moving forward since we do really need to be thinking and practicing globally.
  8. Email Becomes “So 2009” As Social Media Gains Traction. While email has been the eDiscovery darling for the past decade, it’s getting a little long in the tooth.  In the next year, new types of ESI (social media, structured data, loose files, cloud context, mobile device messages, etc.) will cause headaches for a number of enterprises that have been overly email-centric.  Already in 2011, organizations are finding that other sources of ESI like documents/files and structured data are rivaling email in importance for eDiscovery requests, and this trend shows no signs of abating, particularly for regulated industries. This heterogeneous mix of ESI will certainly result in challenges for many companies, with some unlucky ones getting sanctioned because they ignored these emerging data types.
  9. Cost Shifting Will Become More Prevalent – Impacting the “American Rule.” For ages, the American Rule held that producing parties had to pay for their production costs, with a few narrow exceptions.  Next year we’ll see even more courts award winning parties their eDiscovery costs under 28 U.S.C. §1920(4) and Rule 54(d)(1) FRCP. Courts are now beginning to consider the services of an eDiscovery vendor as “the 21st Century equivalent of making copies.”
  10. Risk Assessment Becomes a Critical Component of eDiscovery. Managing risk is a foundational underpinning for litigators generally, but its role in eDiscovery has been a bit obscure.  Now, with the tremendous statistical insights that are made possible by enabling software technologies, it will become increasingly important for counsel to manage risk by deciding what types of error/precision rates are possible.  This risk analysis is particularly critical for conducting any variety of technology assisted review process since precision, recall and f-measure statistics all require a delicate balance of risk and reward.

Accurately divining the future is difficult (some might say impossible), but in the electronic discovery arena many of these predictions can happen if enough practitioners decide they want them to happen.  So, the future is fortunately within reach.

Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG)’s Legal Trends Survey Reveals Alarming Inattention to eDiscovery Spending

Monday, December 5th, 2011

In their latest survey, entitled “E-Discovery Market Trends: A View from the Legal Department,” Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) analysts Brian Babineau and Katey Wood analyze a number of interesting statistics and provide a range of insightful conclusions.  By surveying general counsel from large, mid-market (500-999 employees) and enterprise-class organizations in North America they were able to dive into a range of eDiscovery topics, including pain points, operational expenses and prioritizations on a go-forward basis.  Some are more intuitive than others, but in either case the results serve as good calibration metrics for those who endeavor to understand the corporate eDiscovery state of the nation.

“Most corporations are not tracking e-discovery spending…” In what may be the most notable finding of this ESG report, 60% of survey respondents claim that they did not track annual eDiscovery spending in 2010.  The authors correctly note that the eDiscovery process, “which can be highly unpredictable due to its project-by-project nature to begin with, has historically been outsourced to service providers charging at variable rates and often billed back to companies via their law firms.”  Despite the significant challenges of tracking eDiscovery spending, it’s nevertheless irresponsible for organizations to keep their heads in the sand regarding such a significant operational expense.

As the old saw goes, “you can’t manage what you can’t measure,” so it’s almost inconceivable to think that so many organizations aren’t tracking such a significant expense category.  For organizations who want to create a repeatable business process, as opposed to the fire-drill chaos that is typically associated with eDiscovery, it’s vitally important to accurately capture core eDiscovery metrics.  For starters, it’s useful to understand basic collection parameters, such as of the typical numbers of key custodians, average data volumes per custodian, data expansion rates, de-duplication statistics, etc.  Once these metrics are in place, it then becomes possible to manage the process and reduce costs.

Katey went on to expound in an exclusive quote for EDD 2.0:

“E-discovery can be managed as a strategic business process with an understanding of costs, performance and outcomes. When there’s no basis for reporting or comparison, it’s pin the tail on the donkey.  Corporate litigants won’t ever know they’re getting their money’s worth if they don’t even know what they’re spending.”

“E-Discovery accuracy/efficiency isn’t being measured, in large part.” Similar to the failure to measure eDiscovery costs, a full two thirds of GCs (67%) aren’t tracking the “efficiency and/or accuracy of e-discovery document review.” Until corporate counsel can link expectations of competency/efficiency with oversight and performance metrics, outside law firms will likely avoid having their feet held to the fire.  This passive stance makes transparency and process improvement difficult at best.  Additionally, this model of having expectations for efficiency, with low or no accountability, doesn’t bode well for the quick adoption of enabling technologies like predictive coding, since the driver has to inherently be the need/desire for increased efficiency (which axiomatically equals lower law firm review bills).

“Corporate information governance and litigation readiness (especially defensible deletion) are a priority, but not yet a reality.” From an internal prioritization perspective, more than two thirds (69%) of respondents identified their desire to expire/delete data more consistently, “thereby limiting unnecessary data retention for future litigation requests.”  Savvy enterprises correctly recognized the “multi-prong threat of unregulated data retention: the large amounts of irrelevant data ultimately produced for legal review, the greater difficulty of hanging onto potentially litigious documents past their required retention periods.”

This finding is very encouraging, and it ties into the upward momentum the industry is seeing regarding information governance generally – particularly linking the reactive (right) side of the EDRM with the logically connected and proactive (left) side of the EDRM.  As a good first step it’s critical to see organizations now associating good information governance hygiene with lower costs and better eDiscovery response times.  The ESG finding also triangulates with results from the recent Information Retention and eDiscovery Survey, which found that companies having good information governance hygiene were often able to respond much faster and more successfully to an eDiscovery/investigation requests, often suffering fewer negative consequences.

The only downside to the positive information governance trend, as reported by the survey, was that,

“while there are great benefits to defensible deletion, internal initiatives for implementing it too often are stymied by difficulty in obtaining cross functional consensus and authorization, particularly as it touches so many other critical processes like regulatory compliance and legal hold.”

“Legal hold processes are still very manual.” Another similar question revealed that many companies are attempting to get their information governance house in order, but are still in the very early stages.  When asked about their  current legal hold notification and tracking process, a whopping 69% of organizations said that they are using a “manual process performed by internal staff using e-mail and spreadsheets, etc.”  And, another 6% said they either had no formal process or tracking mechanism.

Given the risks attendant to flaws in the preservation process this area is ripe for improvement.  The good news is that 54% of survey respondents are intending to improve their legal hold process, with 25% planning improvement within the next 12 months.  This is a healthy acknowledgement that there is risk, and with a modicum of investment (time, personnel, procedures, and technology) the legal hold area can be brought up to current best practices.

The ESG survey is a welcome temperature gauge into the state of corporate legal departments.  It notes, in conclusion, “with the staggering growth, diversity and dispersion of data, the pain e-discovery is currently causing large and serial litigants are only a symptom of the larger problem of unwieldy and under-developed information management affecting all businesses.”  With data insights from the ESG survey, it’s becoming clear that foundational information governance elements (like deploying auditable legal hold procedures, tracking eDiscovery spending, updating data maps, etc.) are desperately needed by the many organizations that want to turn eDiscovery into a repeatable business process.  The good news is that many of these organization have improvements in mind for the next 12 months, and the challenge will be to make sure these proactive projects maintain the same level of organizational urgency that it often present for more reactive tasks.

Proactive Retention Means Effective Preservation in eDiscovery

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

It is axiomatic that the law helps those who help themselves.  Perhaps nowhere is that truism more applicable than in the context of electronic discovery.  The organization that implements an effective information governance strategy – including developing reasonable data retention policies – will likely avoid court sanctions and reduce its legal costs.  This was confirmed in a recent industry survey, which found that organizations “help themselves” when they develop information retention policies.  According to the survey, better retention practices drive dramatically better outcomes in litigation, particularly in the context of retention and preservation.

Such a finding is echoed by a recent case issued from the District of Indiana.  In Haraburda v. Arcelor Mittal U.S.A., Inc. (D. Ind. June 28, 2011), the court tied a litigant’s preservation duty to its document retention efforts.  In order to discharge its duty to reactively preserve evidence, the court reasoned that enterprises must proactively create “a ‘comprehensive’ document retention policy that will ensure that relevant documents are retained.”  Failing to implement a retention policy often results in a loss of key information.  And this, opined the court, may result in sanctions.

Such a finding is not limited to an isolated case.  Court decisions from across the United States in 2011 have found the same connection; better data retention practices yield more successful document preservation results.  For example, in the E.I. du Pont de Nemours v. Kolon Industries (E.D. Va. April 27, 2011), the plaintiff manufacturer defeated a sanctions motion due to its effective information retention procedures.   The manufacturer implemented a document retention policy that typically kept emails from former employee accounts for 60 days, after which the emails were overwritten and deleted.   Among the emails deleted pursuant to that policy were several that the defendant argued were relevant to its counter-claims.  The DuPont court declined to impose sanctions, however, since the emails in question were overwritten before the duty to preserve was triggered.  Instead, the court lauded the manufacturer’s preservation efforts, finding that it “took positive steps reasonably calculated to ensure that information . . . was preserved for litigation.”  Because the manufacturer faithfully observed its established retention policy, it reduced a stockpile of email, made relevant documents unavailable for discovery and was still protected from court sanctions.

Similarly, in Viramontes v. U.S. Bancorp (N.D.Ill. Jan. 27, 2011), the defendant bank relied on its data retention protocols to stave off a sanctions motion after deleting several years of email.  Because those emails were destroyed pursuant to a neutral retention policy before a preservation duty attached, the bank was protected from sanctions under the Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 37(e) safe harbor for the destruction of electronic information.

The converse, of course, is also true.  Those organizations that failed to implement effective retention policies have fared poorly in discovery because they have not preserved relevant ESI.  Take the defendant, for instance, in Northington v. H & M International (N.D.Ill. Jan. 12, 2011).  The court issued an adverse inference jury instruction against that company because it spoliated significant emails and other data.  The genesis of this spoliation was the company’s failure to establish a formal document retention policy.  Instead of having a thoughtful, top-down approach, “data retention . . . was evidently handled on an ad hoc, case-by-case basis.”  The company’s failure to develop a pre-litigation information retention policy eventually led to the loss of key information and the court’s sanctions award.

These recent cases and others confirm the correlation between retention and preservation.  Simply put, proactive retention leads to better preservation in eDiscovery.  Anything less could be disastrous in litigation.