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Breaking News: Court Orders Google to Produce eDiscovery Search Terms in Apple v. Samsung

Friday, May 10th, 2013

Apple obtained a narrow discovery victory yesterday in its long running legal battle against fellow technology titan Samsung. In Apple Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd, the court ordered non-party Google to turn over the search terms and custodians that it used to produce documents in response to an Apple subpoena.

According to the court’s order, Apple argued for the production of Google’s search terms and custodians in order “to know how Google created the universe from which it produced documents.” The court noted that Apple sought such information “to evaluate the adequacy of Google’s search, and if it finds that search wanting, it then will pursue other courses of action to obtain responsive discovery.”

Google countered that argument by defending the extent of its production and the burdens that Apple’s request would place on Google as a non-party to Apple’s dispute with Samsung. Google complained that Apple’s demands were essentially a gateway to additional discovery from Google, which would arguably be excessive given Google’s non-party status.

Sensitive to the concerns of both parties, the court struck a middle ground in its order. On the one hand, the court ordered Google to produce the search terms and custodians since that “will aid in uncovering the sufficiency of Google’s production and serves greater purposes of transparency in discovery.” But on the other hand, the court preserved Google’s right to object to any further discovery efforts by Apple: “The court notes that its order does not speak to the sufficiency of Google’s production nor to any arguments Google may make regarding undue burden in producing any further discovery.”

This latest opinion from the Apple v. Samsung series of lawsuits is noteworthy for two reasons. First, the decision is instructive regarding the eDiscovery burdens that non-parties must shoulder in litigation. While the disclosure of a non-party’s underlying search methodology (in this instance, search terms and custodians) may not be unduly burdensome, further efforts to obtain non-party documents could exceed the boundaries of reasonableness that courts have designed to protect non-parties from the vicissitudes of discovery. For as the court in this case observed, a non-party “should not be required to ‘subsidize’ litigation to which it is not a party.”

Second, the decision illustrates that the use of search terms remains a viable method for searching and producing responsive ESI. Despite the increasing popularity of predictive coding technology, it is noteworthy that neither the court nor Apple took issue with Google’s use of search terms in connection with its production process. Indeed, the intelligent use of keyword searches is still an acceptable eDiscovery approach for most courts, particularly where the parties agree on the terms. That other forms of technology assisted review, such as predictive coding, could arguably be more efficient and cost effective in identifying responsive documents does not impugn the use of keyword searches in eDiscovery. Only time will tell whether the use of keyword searches as the primary means for responding to document requests will give way to more flexible approaches that include the use of multiple technology tools.

FOIA Matters! — 2012 Information Governance Survey Results for the Government Sector

Thursday, July 12th, 2012

At this year’s EDGE Summit in April, Symantec polled attendees about a range of government-specific information governance questions. The attendees of the event were primarily comprised of members from IT, Legal, as well as Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) agents, government investigators and records managers. The main purpose of the EDGE survey was to gather attendees’ thoughts on what information governance means for their agencies, discern what actions were being taken to address Big Data challenges, and assess how far along agencies were in their information governance implementations pursuant to the recent Presidential Mandate.

As my colleague Matt Nelson’s blog recounts from the LegalTech conference earlier this year, information governance and predictive coding were among the hottest topics at the LTNY 2012 show and in the industry generally. The EDGE Summit correspondingly held sessions on those two topics, as well as delved deeper into questions that are unique to the government. For example, when asked what the top driver for implementation of an information governance plan in an agency was, three out of four respondents answered “FOIA.”

The fact that FOIA was listed as the top driver for government agencies planning to implement an information governance solution is in line with data reported by the Department of Justice (DOJ) from 2008-2011 on the number of requests received. In 2008, 605,491 FOIA requests were received. This figure grew to 644,165 in 2011. While the increase in FOIA requests is not enormous percentage-wise, what is significant is the reduction in backlogs for FOIA requests. In 2008, there was a backlog of 130,419 requests and was decreased to 83,490 by 2011. This is likely due to the implementation of newer and better technology, coupled with the fact that the current administration has made FOIA request processing a priority.

In 2009, President Obama directed agencies to adopt “a presumption in favor’” of FOIA requests for greater transparency in the government. Agencies have had pressure from the President to improve the response time to (and completeness of) FOIA requests. Washington Post reporter Ed O’Keefe wrote,

“a study by the National Security Archive at George Washington University and the Knight Foundation, found approximately 90 federal agencies are equipped to process FOIA requests, and of those 90, only slightly more than half have taken at least some steps to fulfill Obama’s goal to improve government transparency.”

Agencies are increasingly more focused on complying with FOIA and will continue to improve their IT environments with archiving, eDiscovery and other proactive records management solutions in order to increase access to data.

Not far behind FOIA requests on the list of reasons to implement an information governance plan were “lawsuits” and “internal investigations.” Fortunately, any comprehensive information governance plan will axiomatically address FOIA requests since the technology implemented to accomplish information governance inherently allows for the storage, identification, collection, review and production of data regardless of the specific purpose. The use of information governance technology will not have the same workflow or process for FOIA that an internal investigation would require, for example, but the tools required are the same.

The survey also found that the top three most important activities surrounding information governance were: email/records retention (73%), data security/privacy (73%) and data storage (72%). These concerns are being addressed modularly by agencies with technology like data classification services, archiving, and data loss prevention technologies. In-house eDiscovery tools are also important as they facilitate the redaction of personally identifiable information that must be removed in many FOIA requests.

It is clear that agencies recognize the importance of managing email/records for the purposes of FOIA and this is an area of concern in light of not only the data explosion, but because 53% of respondents reported they are responsible for classifying their own data. Respondents have connected the concept of information governance with records management and the ability to execute more effectively on FOIA requests. Manual classification is rapidly becoming obsolete as data volumes grow, and is being replaced by automated solutions in successfully deployed information governance plans.

Perhaps the most interesting piece of data from the survey was the disclosures about what was preventing governmental agencies from implementing information governance plans. The top inhibitors for the government were “budget,” “internal consensus” and “lack of internal skill sets.” Contrasted with the LegalTech Survey findings from 2012 on information governance, with respondents predominantly from the private sector, the government’s concerns and implementation timelines are slightly different. In the EDGE survey, only 16% of the government respondents reported that they have implemented an information governance solution, contrasted with the 19% of the LegalTech audience. This disparity is partly because the government lacks the budget and the proper internal committee of stakeholders to sponsor and deploy a plan, but the relatively lows numbers in both sectors indicate the nascent state of information governance.

In order for a successful information governance plan to be deployed, “it takes a village,” to quote Secretary Clinton. Without prioritizing coordination between IT, legal, records managers, security, and the other necessary departments on data management, merely having the budget only purchases the technology and does not ensure true governance. In this year’s survey, 95% of EDGE respondents were actively discussing information governance solutions. Over the next two years the percentage of agencies that will submit a solution is expected to triple from 16%-52%. With the directive on records management due this month by the National Archives Records Administration (NARA), the government agencies will have clear guidance on what the best practices are for records management, and this will aid the adoption of automated archiving and records classification workflows.

The future is bright with the initiative by the President and NARA’s anticipated directive to examine the state of technology in the government. The EDGE survey results support the forecast, provided budget can be obtained, that agencies will be in an improved state of information governance within the next two years. This will be an improvement for FOIA request compliance, efficient litigation with the government and increase their ability to effectively conduct internal investigations.

Many would have projected that the results of the survey question on what drives information governance in the government would be litigation, internal investigations, and FOIA requests respectively. And yet, FOIA has recently taken on a more important role given the Obama administration’s focus on transparency and the increased number of requests by citizens. While any one of the drivers could have facilitated updates in process and technology the government clearly needs, FOIA has positive momentum behind it and seems to be the impetus primarily driving information governance. Fortunately, archiving and eDiscovery technology, only two parts of information governance continuum, can help with all three of the aforementioned drivers with different workflows.

Later this month we will examine NARA’s directive and what the impact will be on the government’s technology environment – stay tuned.

7th Circuit eDiscovery Pilot Program Tackles Technology Assisted Review With Mock Arguments

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2012

The 7th Circuit eDiscovery Pilot Program’s Mock Argument is the first of its kind and is slated for June 14, 2012.  It is not surprising that the Seventh Circuit’s eDiscovery Pilot Program would be the first to host an event like this on predictive coding, as the program has been a progressive model across the country for eDiscovery protocols since 2009.  The predictive coding event is open to the public (registration required) and showcases the expertise of leading litigators, technologists and experts from all over the United States.  Speakers include: Jason R. Baron, Director of Litigation at the National Archives and Records Administration; Maura R. Grossman, Counsel at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz; Dr. David Lewis, Technology Expert and co-founder of the TREC Legal Track; Ralph Losey, Partner at Jackson Lewis; Matt Nelson, eDiscovery Counsel at Symantec; Lisa Rosen, President of Rosen Technology ResourcesJeff Sharer, Partner at Sidley Austin; and Tomas Thompson, Senior Associate at DLA Piper.

The eDiscovery 2.0 blog has extensively covered the three recent predictive coding cases currently being litigated, and while real court cases are paramount to the direction of predictive coding, the 7th Circuit program will proactively address a scenario that has not yet been considered by a court.  In Da Silva Moore, the parties agreed to the use of predictive coding, but couldn’t subsequently agree on the protocol.  In Kleen, plaintiffs want defendants to redo their review process using predictive coding even though the production is 99% complete.  And, in Global Aerospace the defendant proactively petitioned to use predictive coding over plaintiff’s objections.  By contrast, in the 7th Circuit’s hypothetical, the mock argument predicts another likely predictive coding scenario; the instance where a defendant has a deployed in-house solution in place and argues against the use of predictive coding before discovery has begun.

Traditionally, courts have been reticent to bless or admonish technology, but rather rule on the reasonableness of an organization’s process and depend on expert testimony for issues beyond that scope.  It is expected that predictive coding will follow suit; however, because so little is understood about how the technology works, interest has been generated in a way the legal technology industry has not seen before, as evidenced by this tactical program.

* * *

The hypothetical dispute is a complex litigation matter pending in a U.S. District Court involving a large public corporation that has been sued by a smaller high-tech competitor for alleged anticompetitive conduct, unfair competition and various business torts.  The plaintiff has filed discovery requests that include documents and communications maintained by the defendant corporation’s vast international sales force.  To expedite discovery and level the playing field in terms of resources and costs, the Plaintiff has requested the use of predictive coding to identify and produce responsive documents.  The defendant, wary of the latest (and untested) eDiscovery technology trends, argues that the organization already has a comprehensive eDiscovery program in place.  The defendant will further argue that the technological investment and defensible processes in-house are more than sufficient for comprehensive discovery, and in fact, were designed in order to implement a repeatable and defensible discovery program.  The methodology of the defendant is estimated to take months and result in the typical massive production set, whereas predictive coding would allegedly make for a shorter discovery period.  Because of the burden, the defendant plans to shift some of these costs to the plaintiff.

Ralph Losey’s role will be as the Magistrate Judge, defense counsel will be Martin T. Tully (partner Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP), with Karl Schieneman (of Review Less/ESI Bytes) as the litigation support manager for the corporation and plaintiff’s counsel will be Sean Byrne (eDiscovery solutions director at Axiom) with Herb Roitblat (of OrcaTec) as plaintiff’s eDiscovery consultant.

As the hottest topic in the eDiscovery world, the promises of predictive coding include: increased search accuracy for relevant documents, decreased cost and time spent for manual review, and possibly greater insight into an organization’s corpus of data allowing for more strategic decision making with regard to early case assessment.  The practical implications of predictive coding use are still to be determined and programs like this one will flesh out some of those issues before they get to the courts, which is good for practitioners and judges alike.  Stay tuned for an analysis of the arguments, as well as a link to the video.

Morton’s Fork, Oil Filters the Nexus with Information Governance

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

Those old enough to have watched TV in the early eighties will undoubtedly remember the FRAM oil slogan where the mechanic utters his iconic catchphrase: “You can pay me now, or pay me later.”  The gist of the vintage ad was that the customer could either pay a small sum now for the replacement of oil filter, or a far greater sum later for the replacement of the car’s entire engine.

This choice between two unpleasant alternatives is sometimes called a Morton’s Fork (but typically only when both choices are equal in difficulty).  The saying (not to be confused with the equally colorful Hobson’s Choice) apparently originated with the collection of taxes by John Morton (the Archbishop of Canterbury) in the late 15th century.  Morton was apparently fond of saying that a man living modestly must be saving money and could therefore afford to pay taxes, whereas if he was living extravagantly then he was obviously rich and could still afford them.[i]

This “pay me now/pay me later” scenario perplexes many of today’s organizations as they try to effectively govern (i.e., understand, discover and retain) electronically stored information (ESI).  The challenge is similar to the oil filter conundrum, in that companies can often make rather modest up-front retention/deletion decisions that help prevent monumental, downstream eDiscovery charges.

This exponential gap has been illustrated recently by a number of surveys contrasting the cost of storage with the cost of conducting basic eDiscovery tasks (such as preservation, collection, processing, review and production).  In a recent AIIM webcast it was noted that “it costs about 20¢/day to buy 1GB of storage, but it costs around $3,500 to review that same gigabyte of storage.” And, it turns out that the $3,500 review estimate (which sounds prohibitively expensive, particularly at scale) may actually be on the conservative side.  While the review phase is roughly 70 percent of the total eDiscovery costs – there is the other 30% that includes upstream costs for preservation, collection and processing.

Similarly, in a recent Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) paper the authors noted that eDiscovery costs range anywhere from $5,000 to $30,000 per gigabyte, citing the Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology.  This $30,000 figure is also roughly in line with other per-gigabyte eDiscovery costs, according to a recent survey by the RAND Corporation.  In an article entitled “Where the Money Goes — Understanding Litigant Expenditures for Producing Electronic Discovery” authors Nicholas M. Pace and Laura Zakaras conducted an extensive analysis and concluded that “… the total costs per gigabyte reviewed were generally around $18,000, with the first and third quartiles in the 35 cases with complete information at $12,000 and $30,000, respectively.”

Given these range of estimates, the $18,000 per gigabyte metric is probably a good midpoint figure that advocates of information governance can use to contrast with the exponentially lower baseline costs of buying and maintaining storage.  It is this stark (and startling) gap between pure information costs and the expenses of eDiscovery that shows how important it is to calculate latent “information risk.”  If you also add in the risks for sanctions due to spoliation, the true (albeit still murky) information risk portrait comes into focus.  It is this calculation that is missing when legal goes to bat to argue about the necessity of information governance solutions, particularly when faced with the host of typical objections (“storage is cheap” … “keep everything” … “there’s no ROI for proactive information governance programs”).

The good news is that as the eDiscovery market continues to evolve, practitioners (legal and IT alike) will come to a better and more holistic understanding of the latent information risk costs that the unchecked proliferation of data causes.  It will be this increased level of transparency that permits the budding information governance trend to become a dominant umbrella concept that unites Legal and IT.



[i] Insert your own current political joke here…

Computer-Assisted Review “Acceptable in Appropriate Cases,” says Judge Peck in new Da Silva Moore eDiscovery Ruling

Saturday, February 25th, 2012

The Honorable Andrew J. Peck, United States Magistrate Judge for the Southern District of New York, issued an opinion and order (order) on February 24th in Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe, stating that computer-assisted review in eDiscovery is “acceptable in appropriate cases.”  The order was issued over plaintiffs’ objection that the predictive coding protocol submitted to the court will not provide an appropriate level of transparency into the predictive coding process.  This and other objections will be reviewed by the district court for error, leaving open the possibility that the order could be modified or overturned.  Regardless of whether or not that happens, Judge Peck’s order makes it clear that the future of predictive coding technology is bright, the role of other eDiscovery technology tools should not be overlooked, and the methodology for using any technology tool is just as important as the tool used.

Plaintiffs’ Objections and Judge Peck’s Preemptive Strikes

In anticipation of the district court’s review, the order preemptively rejects plaintiffs’ assertion that defendant MSL’s protocol is not sufficiently transparent.  In so doing, Judge Peck reasons that plaintiffs will be able to see how MSL codes emails.  If they disagree with MSL’s decisions, plaintiffs will be able to seek judicial intervention. (Id. at 16.)  Plaintiffs appear to argue that although this and other steps in the predictive coding protocol are transparent, the overall protocol (viewed in its entirety) is not transparent or fair.  The crux of plaintiffs’ argument is that just because MSL provides a few peeks behind the curtain during this complex process, many important decisions impacting the accuracy and quality of the document production are being made unilaterally by MSL.  Plaintiffs essentially conclude that such unilateral decision-making does not allow them to properly vet MSL’s methodology, which leads to a fox guarding the hen house problem.

Similarly, Judge Peck dismissed plaintiffs’ argument that expert testimony should have been considered during the status conference pursuant to Rule 702 and the Daubert standard.  In one of many references to his article, “Search, Forward: will manual document review and keyword searches be replaced by computer-assisted coding?” Judge Peck explains:

My article further explained my belief that Daubert would not apply to the results of using predictive coding, but that in any challenge to its use, this Judge would be interested in both the process used and the results.” (Id. at 4.)

The court further hints that results may play a bigger role than science:

“[I]f the use of predictive coding is challenged in a case before me, I will want to know what was done and why that produced defensible results. I may be less interested in the science behind the “black box” of the vendor’s software than in whether it produced responsive documents with reasonably high recall and high precision.” (Id.)

Judge Peck concludes that Rule 702 and Daubert are not applicable to how documents are searched for and found in discovery.  Instead, both deal with the” trial court’s role as gatekeeper to exclude unreliable testimony from being submitted to the jury at trial.” (Id. at 15.)  Despite Judge Peck’s comments, the waters are still murky on this point as evidenced by differing views expressed by Judges Grimm and Facciola in O’Keefe, Equity Analytics, and Victor Stanley.  For example, in Equity Analytics, Judge Facciola addresses the need for expert testimony to support keyword search technology:

[D]etermining whether a particular search methodology, such as keywords, will or will not be effective certainly requires knowledge beyond the ken of a lay person (and a lay lawyer) and requires expert testimony that meets the requirements of Rule 702 of the Federal Rules of Evidence.” (Id. at 333.)

Given the uncertainty regarding the applicability of Rule 702 and Daubert, it will be interesting to see if and how the district court addresses the issue of expert testimony.

What This Order Means and Does not Mean for the Future of Predictive Coding

The order states that “This judicial opinion now recognizes that computer-assisted review is an acceptable way to search for relevant ESI in appropriate cases.” (Id. at 2.)  Recognizing that there have been some erroneous reports, Judge Peck went to great lengths to clarify his order and to “correct the many blogs about this case.” (Id. at 2, fn. 1.)  Some important excerpts are listed below:

The Court did not order the use of predictive coding

“[T]he Court did not order the parties to use predictive coding.  The parties had agreed to defendants’ use of it, but had disputes over the scope and implementation, which the Court ruled on, thus accepting the use of computer-assisted review in this lawsuit.” (Id.)

Computer-assisted review is not required in all cases

“That does not mean computer-assisted review must be used in all cases, or that the exact ESI protocol approved here will be appropriate in all future cases that utilize computer-assisted review. (Id. at 25.)

The opinion should not be considered an endorsement of any particular vendors or tools

“Nor does this Opinion endorse any vendor…, nor any particular computer-assisted review tool.” (Id.)

Predictive coding technology can still be expensive

MSL wanted to only review and produce the top 40,000 documents, which it estimated would cost $200,000 (at $5 per document). (1/4/12 Conf. Tr. at 47-48, 51.)

Process and methodology are as important as the technology utilized

“As with keywords or any other technological solution to eDiscovery, counsel must design an appropriate process, including use of available technology, with appropriate quality control testing, to review and produce relevant ESI while adhering to Rule 1 and Rule 26(b )(2)(C) proportionality.” (Id.)

Conclusion

The final excerpt drives home the points made in a recent Forbes article involving this and another predictive coding case (Kleen Products).  The first point is that there are a range of technology-assisted review (TAR) tools in the litigator’s tool belt that will often be used together in eDiscovery, and predictive coding technology is one of those tools.  Secondly, none of these tools will provide accurate results unless they are relatively easy to use and used properly.  In other words, the carpenter is just as important as the hammer.  Applying these guideposts and demanding cooperation and transparency between the parties will help the bench usher in a new era of eDiscovery technology that is fair and just for everyone.

Judge Peck Issues Order Addressing “Joint Predictive Coding Protocol” in Da Silva Moore eDiscovery Case

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

Litigation attorneys were abuzz last week when a few breaking news stories erroneously reported that The Honorable Andrew J. Peck, United States Magistrate Judge for the Southern District of New York, ordered the parties in a gender discrimination case to use predictive coding technology during discovery.  Despite early reports, the parties in the case (Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Group, et. al.) actually agreed to use predictive coding technology during discovery – apparently of their own accord.  The case is still significant because predictive coding technology in eDiscovery is relatively new to the legal field, and many have been reluctant to embrace a new technological approach to document review due to, among other things, a lack of judicial guidance.

Unfortunately, despite this atmosphere of cooperation, the discussion stalled when the parties realized they were miles apart in terms of defining a mutually agreeable predictive coding protocol.  A February status conference transcript reveals significant confusion and complexity related to issues such as random sampling, quality control testing, and the overall process integrity.  In response, Judge Peck ordered the parties to submit a Joint Protocol for eDiscovery to address eDiscovery generally and the use of predictive coding technology specifically.

The parties submitted their proposed protocol on February 22, 2012 and Judge Peck quickly reduced that submission to a stipulation and order.  The stipulation and order certainly provides more clarity and insight into the process than the status conference transcript.  However, reading the stipulation and order leaves little doubt that the devil is in the details – and there are a lot of details.  Equally clear is the fact that the parties are still in disagreement and the plaintiffs do not support the “joint” protocol laid out in the stipulation and order.  Plaintiffs actually go so far as to incorporate a paragraph into the stipulation and order stating that they “object to this ESI Protocol in its entirety” and they “reserve the right to object to its use in the case.”

These problems underscore some of the points made in a Forbes article published earlier this week titled,Federal Judges Consider Important Issues That Could Shape the Future of Predictive Coding Technology.”  The Forbes article relies in part on a recent predictive coding survey to make the point that, while predictive coding technology has tremendous potential, the solutions need to become more transparent and the workflows must be simplified before they go mainstream.

Survey Says… Information Governance and Predictive Coding Adoption Slow, But Likely to Gain Steam as Technology Improves

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

The biggest legal technology event of the year, otherwise known as LegalTech New York, always seems to have a few common rallying cries and this year was no different.  In addition to cloud computing and social media, predictive coding and information governance were hot topics of discussion that dominated banter among vendors, speakers, and customers.  Symantec conducted a survey on the exhibit show floor to find out what attendees really thought about these two burgeoning areas and to explore what the future might hold.

Information Governance is critical, understood, and necessary – but it is not yet being adequately addressed.

Although 84% of respondents are familiar with the term information governance and 73% believe that an integrated information governance strategy is critical to reducing information risk and cost, only 19% have implemented an information governance solution.  These results beg the question, if information governance is critical, then why aren’t more organizations adopting information governance practices?

Perhaps the answer lies in the cross-functional nature of information governance and confusion about who is responsible for the organization’s information governance strategy.  For example, the survey also revealed that information governance is a concept that incorporates multiple functions across the organization, including email/records retention, data storage, data security and privacy, compliance, and eDiscovery.  Given the broad impact of information governance across the organization, it is no surprise  respondents also indicated that multiple departments within the organization – including Legal, IT, Compliance, and Records Management – have an ownership stake.

These results tend to suggest at least two things.  First, information governance is a concept that touches multiple parts of the organization.  Defining and implementing appropriate information governance policies across the organization should include an integrated strategy that involves key stakeholders within the organization.  Second, recognition that information governance is a common goal across the entire organization highlights the fact that technology must evolve to help address information governance challenges.

The days of relying too heavily on disconnected point solutions to address eDiscovery, storage, data security, and record retention concerns are limited as organizations continue to mandate internal cost cutting and data security measures.  Decreasing the number of point solutions an organization supports and improving integration between the remaining solutions is a key component of a good information governance strategy because it has the effect of driving down technology and labor costs.   Similarly, an integrated solution strategy helps streamline the backup, retrieval, and overall management of critical data, which simultaneously increases worker productivity and reduces organizational risk in areas such as eDiscovery and data loss prevention.

The trail that leads from point solutions to an integrated solution strategy is already being blazed in the eDiscovery space and this trend serves as a good information governance roadmap.  More and more enterprises faced with investigations and litigation avoid the cost and time of deploying point solutions to address legal hold, data collection, data processing, and document review in favor of a single, integrated, enterprise eDiscovery platform.  The resulting reduction in cost and risk is significant and is fueling support for even broader information governance initiatives in other areas.  These broader initiatives will still include integrated eDiscovery solutions, but the initiatives will continue to expand the integrated solution approach into other areas such as storage management, record retention, and data security technologies to name a few.

Despite mainstream familiarity, predictive coding technology has not yet seen mainstream adoption but the future looks promising.

Much like the term information governance, most respondents were familiar with predictive coding technology for electronic discovery, but the survey results indicated that adoption of the technology to date has been weak.  Specifically, the survey revealed that while 97% of respondents are familiar with the term predictive coding, only 12% have adopted predictive coding technology.  Another 19% are “currently adopting” or plan to adopt predictive coding technology, but the timeline for adoption is unclear.

When asked what challenges “held back” respondents from adopting predictive coding technology, most cited accuracy, cost, and defensibility as their primary concerns.  Concerns about “privilege/confidentiality” and difficulty understanding the technology were also cited as reasons impeding adoption.  Significantly, 70% of respondents believe that predictive coding technology would “go mainstream” if it was easier to use, more transparent, and less expensive. These findings are consistent with the observations articulated in my recent blog (2012:  Year of the Dragon and Predictive Coding – Will the eDiscovery Landscape Be Forever Changed?)

The survey results combined with the potential cost savings associated with predictive coding technology suggest that the movement toward predictive coding technology is gaining steam.  Lawyers are typically reluctant to embrace new technology that is not intuitive because it is difficult to defend a process that is difficult to understand.  The complexity and confusion surrounding today’s predictive coding technology was highlighted recently in Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Group, et. al. during a recent status conference.  The case is venued in Southern District of New York Federal Court before Judge Andrew Peck and serves as further evidence that predictive coding technology is gaining steam.  Expect future proceedings in the Da Silva Moore case to further validate these survey results by revealing both the promise and complexity of current predictive coding technologies.  Similarly, expect next generation predictive coding technology to address current complexities by becoming easier to use, more transparent, and less expensive.

LTNY Wrap-Up – What Did We Learn About eDiscovery?

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Now that that dust has settled, the folks who attended LegalTech New York 2012 can try to get to the mountain of emails that accumulated during the event that was LegalTech. Fortunately, there was no ice storm this year, and for the most part, people seemed to heed my “what not to do at LTNY” list. I even found the Starbucks across the street more crowded than the one in the hotel. There was some alcohol-induced hooliganism at a vendor’s party, but most of the other social mixers seemed uniformly tame.

Part of Dan Patrick’s syndicated radio show features a “What Did We Learn Today?” segment, and that inquiry seems fitting for this year’s LegalTech.

  • First of all, the prognostications about buzzwords were spot on, with no shortage of cycles spent on predictive coding (aka Technology Assisted Review). The general session on Monday, hosted by Symantec, had close to a thousand attendees on the edge of their seats to hear Judge Peck, Maura Grossman and Ralph Losey wax eloquently about the ongoing man versus machine debate. Judge Peck uttered a number of quotable sound bites, including the quote of the day: “Keyword searching is absolutely terrible, in terms of statistical responsiveness.” Stay tuned for a longer post with more comments from the General session.
  • Ralph Losey went one step further when commenting on keyword search, stating: “It doesn’t work,… I hope it’s been discredited.” A few have commented that this lambasting may have gone too far, and I’d tend to agree.  It’s not that keyword search is horrific per se. It’s just that its efficacy is limited and the hubris of the average user, who thinks eDiscovery search is like Google search, is where the real trouble lies. It’s important to keep in mind that all these eDiscovery applications are just like tools in the practitioners’ toolbox and they need to be deployed for the right task. Otherwise, the old saw (pun intended) that “when you’re a hammer everything looks like a nail” will inevitably come true.
  • This year’s show also finally put a nail in the coffin of the human review process as the eDiscovery gold standard. That doesn’t mean that attorneys everywhere will abandon the linear review process any time soon, but hopefully it’s becoming increasingly clear that the “evil we know” isn’t very accurate (on top of being very expensive). If that deadly combination doesn’t get folks experimenting with technology assisted review, I don’t know what will.
  • Information governance was also a hot topic, only paling in comparison to Predictive Coding. A survey Symantec conducted at the show indicated that this topic is gaining momentum, but still has a ways to go in terms of action. While 73% of respondents believe an integrated information governance strategy is critical to reducing information risk, only 19% have implemented a system to help them with the problem. This gap presumably indicates a ton of upside for vendors who have a good, attainable information governance solution set.
  • The Hilton still leaves much to be desired as a host location. As they say, familiarity breeds contempt, and for those who’ve notched more than a handful of LegalTech shows, the venue can feel a bit like the movie Groundhog Day, but without Bill Murray. Speculation continues to run rampant about a move to the Javits Center, but the show would likely need to expand pretty significantly before ALM would make the move. And, if there ever was a change, people would assuredly think back with nostalgia on the good old days at the Hilton.
  • Despite the bright lights and elevator advertisement trauma, the mood seemed pretty ebullient, with tons of partnerships, product announcements and consolidation. This positive vibe was a nice change after the last two years when there was still a dark cloud looming over the industry and economy in general.
  • Finally, this year’s show also seemed to embrace social media in a way that it hadn’t done so in years past. Yes, all the social media vehicles were around in years past, but this year many of the vendors’ campaigns seemed to be much more integrated. It was funny to see even the most technically resistant lawyers log in to Twitter (for the first time) to post comments about the show as a way to win premium vendor swag. Next year, I’m sure we’ll see an even more pervasive social media influence, which is a bit ironic given the eDiscovery challenges associated with collecting and reviewing social media content.

Lessons Learned for 2012: Spotlighting the Top eDiscovery Cases from 2011

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

The New Year has now dawned and with it, the certainty that 2012 will bring new developments to the world of eDiscovery.  Last month, we spotlighted some eDiscovery trends for 2012 that we feel certain will occur in the near term.  To understand how these trends will play out, it is instructive to review some of the top eDiscovery cases from 2011.  These decisions provide a roadmap of best practices that the courts promulgated last year.  They also spotlight the expectations that courts will likely have for organizations in 2012 and beyond.

Issuing a Timely and Comprehensive Litigation Hold

Case: E.I. du Pont de Nemours v. Kolon Industries (E.D. Va. July 21, 2011)

Summary: The court issued a stiff rebuke against defendant Kolon Industries for failing to issue a timely and proper litigation hold.  That rebuke came in the form of an instruction to the jury that Kolon executives and employees destroyed key evidence after the company’s preservation duty was triggered.  The jury responded by returning a stunning $919 million verdict for DuPont.

The spoliation at issue occurred when several Kolon executives and employees deleted thousands emails and other records relevant to DuPont’s trade secret claims.  The court laid the blame for this destruction on the company’s attorneys and executives, reasoning they could have prevented the spoliation through an effective litigation hold process.  At issue were three hold notices circulated to the key players and data sources.  The notices were all deficient in some manner.  They were either too limited in their distribution, ineffective since they were prepared in English for Korean-speaking employees, or too late to prevent or otherwise ameliorate the spoliation.

The Lessons for 2012: The DuPont case underscores the importance of issuing a timely and comprehensive litigation hold notice.  As DuPont teaches, organizations should identify what key players and data sources may have relevant information.  A comprehensive notice should then be prepared to communicate the precise hold instructions in an intelligible fashion.  Finally, the hold should be circulated immediately to prevent data loss.

Organizations should also consider deploying the latest technologies to help effectuate this process.  This includes an eDiscovery platform that enables automated legal hold acknowledgements.  Such technology will allow custodians to be promptly and properly apprised of litigation and thereby retain information that might otherwise have been discarded.

Another Must-Read Case: Haraburda v. Arcelor Mittal U.S.A., Inc. (D. Ind. June 28, 2011)

Suspending Document Retention Policies

Case: Viramontes v. U.S. Bancorp (N.D. Ill. Jan. 27, 2011)

Summary: The defendant bank defeated a sanctions motion because it modified aspects of its email retention policy once it was aware litigation was reasonably foreseeable.  The bank implemented a retention policy that kept emails for 90 days, after which the emails were overwritten and destroyed.  The bank also promulgated a course of action whereby the retention policy would be promptly suspended on the occurrence of litigation or other triggering event.  This way, the bank could establish the reasonableness of its policy in litigation.  Because the bank followed that procedure in good faith, it was protected from court sanctions under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure 37(e) “safe harbor.”

The Lesson for 2012: As Viramontes shows, an organization can be prepared for eDiscovery disputes by timely suspending aspects of its document retention policies.  By modifying retention policies when so required, an organization can develop a defensible retention procedure and be protected from court sanctions under Rule 37(e).

Coupling those procedures with archiving software will only enhance an organization’s eDiscovery preparations.  Effective archiving software will have a litigation hold mechanism, which enables an organization to suspend automated retention rules.  This will better ensure that data subject to a preservation duty is actually retained.

Another Must-Read Case: Micron Technology, Inc. v. Rambus Inc., 645 F.3d 1311 (Fed. Cir. 2011)

Managing the Document Collection Process

Case: Northington v. H & M International (N.D.Ill. Jan. 12, 2011)

Summary: The court issued an adverse inference jury instruction against a company that destroyed relevant emails and other data.  The spoliation occurred in large part because legal and IT were not involved in the collection process.  For example, counsel was not actively engaged in the critical steps of preservation, identification or collection of electronically stored information (ESI).  Nor was IT brought into the picture until 15 months after the preservation duty was triggered. By that time, rank and file employees – some of whom were accused by the plaintiff of harassment – stepped into this vacuum and conducted the collection process without meaningful oversight.  Predictably, key documents were never found and the court had little choice but to promise to inform the jury that the company destroyed evidence.

The Lesson for 2012: An organization does not have to suffer the same fate as the company in the Northington case.  It can take charge of its data during litigation through cooperative governance between legal and IT.  After issuing a timely and effective litigation hold, legal should typically involve IT in the collection process.  Legal should rely on IT to help identify all data sources – servers, systems and custodians – that likely contain relevant information.  IT will also be instrumental in preserving and collecting that data for subsequent review and analysis by legal.  By working together in a top-down fashion, organizations can better ensure that their eDiscovery process is defensible and not fatally flawed.

Another Must-Read Case: Green v. Blitz U.S.A., Inc. (E.D. Tex. Mar. 1, 2011)

Using Proportionality to Dictate the Scope of Permissible Discovery

Case: DCG Systems v. Checkpoint Technologies (N.D. Ca. Nov. 2, 2011)

The court adopted the new Model Order on E-Discovery in Patent Cases recently promulgated by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  The model order incorporates principles of proportionality to reduce the production of email in patent litigation.  In adopting the order, the court explained that email productions should be scaled back since email is infrequently introduced as evidence at trial.  As a result, email production requests will be restricted to five search terms and may only span a defined set of five custodians.  Furthermore, email discovery in DCG Systems will wait until after the parties complete discovery on the “core documentation” concerning the patent, the accused product and prior art.

The Lesson for 2012: Courts seem to be slowly moving toward a system that incorporates proportionality as the touchstone for eDiscovery.  This is occurring beyond the field of patent litigation, as evidenced by other recent cases.  Even the State of Utah has gotten in on the act, revising its version of Rule 26 to require that all discovery meet the standards of proportionality.  While there are undoubtedly deviations from this trend (e.g., Pippins v. KPMG (S.D.N.Y. Oct. 7, 2011)), the clear lesson is that discovery should comply with the cost cutting mandate of Federal Rule 1.

Another Must-Read Case: Omni Laboratories Inc. v. Eden Energy Ltd [2011] EWHC 2169 (TCC) (29 July 2011)

Leveraging eDiscovery Technologies for Search and Review

Case: Oracle America v. Google (N.D. Ca. Oct. 20, 2011)

The court ordered Google to produce an email that it previously withheld on attorney client privilege grounds.  While the email’s focus on business negotiations vitiated Google’s claim of privilege, that claim was also undermined by Google’s production of eight earlier drafts of the email.  The drafts were produced because they did not contain addressees or the heading “attorney client privilege,” which the sender later inserted into the final email draft.  Because those details were absent from the earlier drafts, Google’s “electronic scanning mechanisms did not catch those drafts before production.”

The Lesson for 2012: Organizations need to leverage next generation, robust technology to support the document production process in discovery.  Tools such as email analytical software, which can isolate drafts and offer to remove them from production, are needed to address complex production issues.  Other technological capabilities, such as Near Duplicate Identification, can also help identify draft materials and marry them up with finals that have been marked as privileged.  Last but not least, technology assisted review has the potential of enabling one lawyer to efficiently complete the work that previously took thousands of hours.  Finding the budget and doing the research to obtain the right tools for the enterprise should be a priority for organizations in 2012.

Another Must-Read Case: J-M Manufacturing v. McDermott, Will & Emery (CA Super. Jun. 2, 2011)

Conclusion

There were any number of other significant cases from 2011 that could have made this list.  We invite you to share your favorites in the comments section or contact us directly with your feedback.

For more on the cases discussed above, watch this video:

Top Ten eDiscovery Predictions for 2012

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

As 2011 comes quickly to a close we’ve attempted, as in years past, to do our best Carnac impersonation and divine the future of eDiscovery.  Some of these predictions may happen more quickly than others, but it’s our sense that all will come to pass in the near future – it’s just a matter of timing.

  1. Technology Assisted Review (TAR) Gains Speed.  The area of Technology Assisted Review is very exciting since there are a host of emerging technologies that can help make the review process more efficient, ranging from email threading, concept search, clustering, predictive coding and the like.  There are two fundamental challenges however.  First, the technology doesn’t work in a vacuum, meaning that the workflows need to be properly designed and the users need to make accurate decisions because those judgment calls often are then magnified by the application.  Next, the defensibility of the given approach needs to be well vetted.  While it’s likely not necessary (or practical) to expect a judge to mandate the use of a specific technological approach, it is important for the applied technologies to be reasonable, transparent and auditable since the worst possible outcome would be to have a technology challenged and then find the producing party unable to adequately explain their methodology.
  2. The Custodian-Based Collection Model Comes Under Stress. Ever since the days of Zubulake, litigants have focused on “key players” as a proxy for finding relevant information during the eDiscovery process.  Early on, this model worked particularly well in an email-centric environment.  But, as discovery from cloud sources, collaborative worksites (like SharePoint) and other unstructured data repositories continues to become increasingly mainstream, the custodian-oriented collection model will become rapidly outmoded because it will fail to take into account topically-oriented searches.  This trend will be further amplified by the bench’s increasing distrust of manual, custodian-based data collection practices and the presence of better automated search methods, which are particularly valuable for certain types of litigation (e.g., patent disputes, product liability cases).
  3. The FRCP Amendment Debate Will Rage On – Unfortunately Without Much Near Term Progress. While it is clear that the eDiscovery preservation duty has become a more complex and risk laden process, it’s not clear that this “pain” is causally related to the FRCP.  In the notes from the Dallas mini-conference, a pending Sedona survey was quoted referencing the fact that preservation challenges were increasing dramatically.  Yet, there isn’t a consensus viewpoint regarding which changes, if any, would help improve the murky problem.  In the near term this means that organizations with significant preservation pains will need to better utilize the rules that are on the books and deploy enabling technologies where possible.
  4. Data Hoarding Increasingly Goes Out of Fashion. The war cry of many IT professionals that “storage is cheap” is starting to fall on deaf ears.  Organizations are realizing that the cost of storing information is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the litigation risk of having terabytes (and conceivably petabytes) of unstructured, uncategorized and unmanaged electronically stored information (ESI).  This tsunami of information will increasingly become an information liability for organizations that have never deleted a byte of information.  In 2012, more corporations will see the need to clean out their digital houses and will realize that such cleansing (where permitted) is a best practice moving forward.  This applies with equal force to the US government, which has recently mandated such an effort at President Obama’s behest.
  5. Information Governance Becomes a Viable Reality.  For several years there’s been an effort to combine the reactive (far right) side of the EDRM with the logically connected proactive (far left) side of the EDRM.  But now, a number of surveys have linked good information governance hygiene with better response times to eDiscovery requests and governmental inquires, as well as a corresponding lower chance of being sanctioned and the ability to turn over less responsive information.  In 2012, enterprises will realize that the litigation use case is just one way to leverage archival and eDiscovery tools, further accelerating adoption.
  6. Backup Tapes Will Be Increasingly Seen as a Liability.  Using backup tapes for disaster recovery/business continuity purposes remains a viable business strategy, although backing up to tape will become less prevalent as cloud backup increases.  However, if tapes are kept around longer than necessary (days versus months) then they become a ticking time bomb when a litigation or inquiry event crops up.
  7. International eDiscovery/eDisclosure Processes Will Continue to Mature. It’s easy to think of the US as dominating the eDiscovery landscape. While this is gospel for us here in the States, international markets are developing quickly and in many ways are ahead of the US, particularly with regulatory compliance-driven use cases, like the UK Bribery Act 2010.  This fact, coupled with the menagerie of international privacy laws, means we’ll be less Balkanized in our eDiscovery efforts moving forward since we do really need to be thinking and practicing globally.
  8. Email Becomes “So 2009” As Social Media Gains Traction. While email has been the eDiscovery darling for the past decade, it’s getting a little long in the tooth.  In the next year, new types of ESI (social media, structured data, loose files, cloud context, mobile device messages, etc.) will cause headaches for a number of enterprises that have been overly email-centric.  Already in 2011, organizations are finding that other sources of ESI like documents/files and structured data are rivaling email in importance for eDiscovery requests, and this trend shows no signs of abating, particularly for regulated industries. This heterogeneous mix of ESI will certainly result in challenges for many companies, with some unlucky ones getting sanctioned because they ignored these emerging data types.
  9. Cost Shifting Will Become More Prevalent – Impacting the “American Rule.” For ages, the American Rule held that producing parties had to pay for their production costs, with a few narrow exceptions.  Next year we’ll see even more courts award winning parties their eDiscovery costs under 28 U.S.C. §1920(4) and Rule 54(d)(1) FRCP. Courts are now beginning to consider the services of an eDiscovery vendor as “the 21st Century equivalent of making copies.”
  10. Risk Assessment Becomes a Critical Component of eDiscovery. Managing risk is a foundational underpinning for litigators generally, but its role in eDiscovery has been a bit obscure.  Now, with the tremendous statistical insights that are made possible by enabling software technologies, it will become increasingly important for counsel to manage risk by deciding what types of error/precision rates are possible.  This risk analysis is particularly critical for conducting any variety of technology assisted review process since precision, recall and f-measure statistics all require a delicate balance of risk and reward.

Accurately divining the future is difficult (some might say impossible), but in the electronic discovery arena many of these predictions can happen if enough practitioners decide they want them to happen.  So, the future is fortunately within reach.