24h-payday

Posts Tagged ‘archive’

South Africa’s Motivation for Information Governance: Privacy, Fraud and the Cloud

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

On a recent trip to South Africa, where Symantec sponsored an event with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) entitled The Protection of Personal Information (POPI) Drives Information Governance, customers and partners shared important insights. One major concern the attendees had was how they will comply with the newly proposed privacy legislation set to pass any day now.

POPI is the first comprehensive body of law addressing privacy in the country. Personal data is defined as a natural person’s name, date of birth, national identification number, passport number, health or credit information and other personally identifiable information. The bill has eight principles, each of which addresses aspects of how data must be collected, stored, processed, secured, expired and how access may be granted. This bill will apply to both public and private organizations and is driving the need for archiving, classification, eDiscovery, and data loss prevention technology.

Interestingly, the main motivator for purchasing eDiscovery technology will be the need for organizations in Africa to be able to conduct internal investigations to detect fraud. South Africa’s recent POPI legislation was crafted in order to address the age of digital information and the risks associated with it, but also to instill a level of confidence from the global economy in South Africa as a safe place to do business. A recent survey by Compuscan found that South Africa and Nigeria have the highest number of reported fraud cases in Africa. In addition, fraud related crimes have cost African businesses and governments at least $10.9 billion in 2011-12. Of the 875 reported cases, 40% of fraud perpetrators were in upper management.

Archiving the email of top management is a recommended best practice to address this fraud because it ensures that there will be a record of electronic communications should an investigation or lawsuit be necessary. Similarly, leveraging in-house eDiscovery and data loss prevention (DLP) technology enables investigators within the organizations to collect and analyze these emails in conjunction with other pertinent information to detect and even prevent fraud. To date, the majority of organizations in South Africa lack this kind of capability because they have not invested in technology.

Because corruption and fraud have been impediments to doing business in South Africa in the past, businesses and the government are taking steps to address these issues. Having the ability to conduct internal investigations will be a huge advantage for organizations looking to gain control over their information and those who commit fraud. PwC Partner Kris Budnik noted at the conference, “Many times when clients call me for an emergency forensic investigation, about 50% of the time in South Africa I cannot help them.  The reason for this is that the clients are not keeping the appropriate information governance systems in place and not keeping log files. Many times when we go to collect evidence, none is there because it has truly been overwritten in the data environment due to poor information governance practices.”

Litigation does not appear to be the biggest factor for purchasing eDiscovery technologies and implementing workflows as one might expect. The reason for this is unclear, but may be related to a less aggressive litigation profile as compared to that of the U.S. Much of the discovery in South Africa that involves electronically stored information is printed, reviewed and produced in paper format. The concern over retaining relevant metadata and reviewing/producing data in the format data was originally created does not seem to be top of mind for litigators.

Litigators in South Africa are not taking advantage of the rich information in metadata to supplement their cases or to challenge opposing counsel’s claims/productions. Also of concern is the inability to deduplicate and sort data once metadata is removed. The reason for this is most likely because there have not been enough cases where lack of metadata has been challenged. With time, and as cross-border litigation increases, there will be more demand for eDiscovery technology in the traditional legal context.

The increase in privacy concerns and internal fraud investigations presents a compelling reason for investing in archiving, eDiscovery, and DLP technologies for businesses in South Africa. Many organizations are moving data to the cloud to streamline POPI related objectives faster and because outsourcing their infrastructure is very attractive to organizations that don’t want to own the responsibilities of managing their information on premise. The main business drivers for cloud archiving in South Africa are: email continuity, cost and compliance.

It is interesting to observe how different countries and economies respond to technology and what drives use cases. The legal frameworks in each jurisdiction around the world vary, but the great equalizer will be technology. This is because whether it is privacy, litigation or fraud driving the information governance plan, the technology is the same.

Check out this article for more information on privacy legislation in South Africa.

Available soon: please visit our eDiscovery passport page for more information the legal system, eDiscovery, privacy and data protection in South Africa and other countries.

 

Test your legal knowledge in the eDi$covery Cab at LegalTech Event 2013

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

We know how much you miss taking the bar. Or perhaps you just miss the excitement of the certified fraud examiner or forensic accountant exams. We understand—you long to showcase your legal trivia expertise again. To satisfy your craving, Symantec is offering a chance to test your hard earned eDiscovery knowledge at LegalTech, and to do it under game show pressure. Are you ready to meet the challenge…find out more here.

At LegalTech New York 2013, a few lucky attendees will be selected to face celebrity host Ben Bailey in the eDi$covery Cab. Picking up outside the Hilton, next to the infamous Symantec and Sweetery food truck café, attendees will have a chance to take a ride, answer eDiscovery related questions and win cash. Not an expert on FRCP rule 26 (a) through (g)? Then bring your fellow LTNY-attending colleagues and compete as a team. 

To have a chance to play, LegalTech 2013 attendees must register here.

Symantec will match all winnings in the eDi$covery Cab and donate to the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City for Hurricane Sandy relief, supporting long term restoration efforts in New York City. Contestants will also have the opportunity to donate their winnings to the same fund.    

Don’t miss our microsite for a look at Symantec’s LTNY 2013 presence, complete with the LegalTech New York video series, SuperSession schedules and details of the daily MacBook Air photo contest.

LegalTech Plenary 2013: Symantec Mediates the eDiscovery Debate of the Year

Thursday, January 10th, 2013

The eDiscovery frenzy that has gripped the American legal system over the past decade has become increasingly expensive. Particularly costly to both clients and the courts is the process of preserving and reviewing ESI. As a solution to these costs, many are emphasizing the concept of “proportionality.” Proportionality typically requires that the benefits of discovery be commensurate with its corresponding burdens.

Despite nearly universal agreement that eDiscovery should be governed by proportionality standards, there remains a polarizing debate that threatens to curtail the impact of proportionality. That debate is centered on disagreements over the scope of ESI preservation, the standard for permissible discovery and the use of cutting edge review technologies like predictive coding.

To better understand these issues and to explore feasible solutions, Philip Favro, Discovery Counsel at Symantec, will lead a lively discussion at LegalTech New York among industry leaders such U.S. Magistrate Judge Frank Maas, Ariana Tadler of Milberg LLP and Shawn Cheadle, General Counsel (Military Space) at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. The panelists will take stances on either side of difficult questions like:

  •  Should proportionality standards apply to the preservation of ESI to help address the high costs of retaining so much data?
  • Will the proportionality rule ever be used to rein in lawyers and judges that have distorted the standard of discovery from reasonableness to perfection?
  • Can predictive coding facilitate proportional discovery when lawyers are unwilling to share their training set of documents?

While our expert panelists are well-versed in both sides of the proportionality debate, we had a little fun imagining what they might be going through before they take the stage on Tuesday, January 29th.  Watch this video to get an exclusive behind-the-scenes look into the LTNY Locker Room.

In addition, don’t miss our microsite for the complete plenary session description and a look at Symantec’s LTNY 2013 presence. We hope you stay tuned to eDiscovery 2.0 from now until the show to hear what Symantec has planned for the supersessions, our special event, contest giveaways and product announcements.

Legal Tech 2013 Sessions: Symantec explores eDiscovery beyond the EDRM

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

Having previously predicted the ‘happenings-to-be’ as well as recommended the ‘what not to do’ at LegalTech New York, the veteran LTNY team here at Symantec has decided to build anticipation for the 2013 event via a video series starring the LTNY un-baptized associate.  Get introduced to our eDiscovery-challenged protagonist in the first of our videos (above).

As for this year’s show we’re pleased to expand our presence and are very excited to introduce eDiscovery without limits, along with a LegalTech that promises sessions, social events and opportunities for attendees in the same vein.   In regards to the first aspect – the sessions – the team of Symantec eDiscovery counsels will moderate panelist sessions on topics ranging across and beyond the EDRM.  Joined by distinguished industry representatives they’ll push the discussion deeper in 5 sessions with a potential 6 hours of CLE credits offered to the attendees.

Matt Nelson, resident author of Predictive Coding for Dummies will moderate “How good is your predictive coding poker face?” where panelists tackle the recently controversial subjects of disclosing the use of Predictive Coding technology, statistical sampling and the production of training sets to the opposition.

Allison Walton will moderate, “eDiscovery in 3D: The New Generation of Early Case Assessment Techniques” where panelists will enlighten the crowd on taking ECA upstream into the information creation and retention stages and implementing an executable information governance workflow.  Allison will also moderate “You’re Doing it Wrong!!! How To Avoid Discovery Sanctions Due to a Flawed Legal Hold Process” where panelists recommend best practices towards a defensible legal hold process in light of potential changes in the FRCP and increased judicial scrutiny of preservation efforts.

Phil Favro will moderate “Protecting Your ESI Blindside: Why a “Defensible Deletion” Offense is the Best eDiscovery Defense” where panelists debate the viability of defensible deletion in the enterprise, the related court decisions to consider and quantifying the ROI to support a deletion strategy.

Chris Talbott will moderate a session on “Bringing eDiscovery back to Basics with the Clearwell eDiscovery Platform”, where engineer Anna Simpson will demonstrate Clearwell technology in the context of our panelist’s everyday use on cases ranging from FCPA inquires to IP litigation.

Please browse our microsite for complete supersession descriptions and a look at Symantec’s LTNY 2013 presence.  We hope you stay tuned to eDiscovery 2.0 throughout January to hear what Symantec has planned for the plenary session, our special event, contest giveaways and product announcements.

Symantec Positioned Highest in Execution and Vision in Gartner Archiving MQ

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

Once again Gartner has named Symantec as a leader in the Enterprise Information Archiving magic quadrant.  We’ve continued to invest significantly in this market and it is gratifying to see the recognition for the continued effort we put into archiving both in the cloud and on premises with our Enterprise Vault.cloud and Enterprise Vault products. Symantec has now been rated a leader 9 years in a row.

 

This graphic was published by Gartner, Inc. as part of a larger research document and should be evaluated in the context of the entire document. The Gartner document is available upon request from Symantec.

Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in the Magic Quadrant, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

 This year marks a transition in a couple of regards.  We are seeing an acceleration of customers looking for the convenience and simplicity of SaaS based archiving solution. The caveat being that they want the security and trust that only a vendor like Symantec can deliver.

Similarly the market has continued to ask for integrated solutions that deliver information archiving and eDiscovery to quickly address often complex and time sensitive process of litigation and regulatory requests.  The deep integration we offer between our archiving solutions – Enterprise Vault and Enterprise Vault.cloud – and the Clearwell eDiscovery Platform has led many customers to deploy these together to streamline their eDiscovery workflow.

An archive is inherently deployed with the long term in mind.  Over the history of Gartner’s Enterprise Information Archiving MQ, only Symantec has provided a consistent solution to customers by investing and innovating with Enterprise Vault to lead the industry in performance, functionality, and support without painful migrations or changes. 

We’re excited about what we have planned next for Enterprise Vault and Enterprise Vault.cloud and intend to maintain our leadership in the years to come. Our customers will continue to be able to manage their critical information assets and meet their needs for eDiscovery and Information Governance as we improve our products year after year.

Spotlighting the Top Electronic Discovery Cases from 2012

Friday, December 14th, 2012

With the New Year quickly approaching, it is worth reflecting on some of the key eDiscovery developments that have occurred during 2012. While legislative, regulatory and rulemaking bodies have undoubtedly impacted eDiscovery, the judiciary has once again played the most dramatic role.  There are several lessons from the top 2012 court cases that, if followed, will likely help organizations reduce the costs and risks associated with eDiscovery. These cases also spotlight the expectations that courts will likely have for organizations in 2013 and beyond.

Implementing a Defensible Deletion Strategy

Case: Brigham Young University v. Pfizer, 282 F.R.D. 566 (D. Utah 2012)

In Brigham Young, the plaintiff university had pressed for sanctions as a result of Pfizer’s destruction of key documents pursuant to its information retention policies. The court rejected that argument because such a position failed to appreciate the basic workings of a valid corporate retention schedule. As the court reasoned, “[e]vidence may simply be discarded as a result of good faith business procedures.” When those procedures operate to inadvertently destroy evidence before the duty to preserve is triggered, the court held that sanctions should not issue: “The Federal Rules protect from sanctions those who lack control over the requested materials or who have discarded them as a result of good faith business procedures.”

Summary: The Brigham Young case is significant since it emphasizes that organizations should implement a defensible deletion strategy to rid themselves of data stockpiles. Absent a preservation duty or other exceptional circumstances, organizations that pare back ESI pursuant to “good faith business procedures” (such as a neutral retention policy) will be protected from sanctions.

**Another Must-Read Case: Danny Lynn Elec. v. Veolia Es Solid Waste (M.D. Ala. Mar. 9, 2012)

Issuing a Timely and Comprehensive Litigation Hold

Case: Apple, Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, — F. Supp. 2d. — (N.D. Cal. 2012)

Summary: The court first issued an adverse inference instruction against Samsung to address spoliation charges brought by Apple. In particular, the court faulted Samsung for failing to circulate a comprehensive litigation hold instruction when it first anticipated litigation. This eventually culminated in the loss of emails from several key Samsung custodians, inviting the court’s adverse inference sanction.

Ironically, however, Apple was subsequently sanctioned for failing to issue a proper hold notice. Just like Samsung, Apple failed to distribute a hold until several months after litigation was reasonably foreseeable. The tardy hold instruction, coupled with evidence suggesting that Apple employees were “encouraged to keep the size of their email accounts below certain limits,” ultimately led the court to conclude that Apple destroyed documents after its preservation duty ripened.

The Lesson for 2013: The Apple case underscores the importance of issuing a timely and comprehensive litigation hold notice. For organizations, this likely means identifying the key players and data sources that may have relevant information and then distributing an intelligible hold instruction. It may also require suspending aspects of information retention policies to preserve relevant ESI. By following these best practices, organizations can better avoid the sanctions bogeyman that haunts so many litigants in eDiscovery.

**Another Must-Read Case: Chin v. Port Authority of New York, 685 F.3d 135 (2nd Cir. 2012)

Judicial Approval of Predictive Coding

Case: Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe, — F.R.D. — (S.D.N.Y. Feb. 24, 2012)

Summary: The court entered an order that turned out to be the first of its kind: approving the use of predictive coding technology in the discovery phase of litigation. That order was entered pursuant to the parties’ stipulation, which provided that defendant MSL Group could use predictive coding in connection with its obligation to produce relevant documents. Pursuant to that order, the parties methodically (yet at times acrimoniously) worked over several months to fine tune the originally developed protocol to better ensure the production of relevant documents by defendant MSL.

The Lesson for 2013: The court declared in its order that predictive coding “is an acceptable way to search for relevant ESI in appropriate cases.” Nevertheless, the court also made clear that this technology is not the exclusive method now for conducting document review. Instead, predictive coding should be viewed as one of many different types of tools that often can and should be used together.

**Another Must-Read Case: In Re: Actos (Pioglitazone) Prods. Liab. Litig. (W.D. La. July 10, 2012)

Proportionality and Cooperation are Inextricably Intertwined

Case: Pippins v. KPMG LLP, 279 F.R.D. 245 (S.D.N.Y. 2012)

Summary: The court ordered the defendant accounting firm (KPMG) to preserve thousands of employee hard drives. The firm had argued that the high cost of preserving the drives was disproportionate to the value of the ESI stored on the drives. Instead of preserving all of the drives, the firm hoped to maintain a reduced sample, asserting that the ESI on the sample drives would satisfy the evidentiary demands of the plaintiffs’ class action claims.

The court rejected the proportionality argument primarily because the firm refused to permit plaintiffs or the court to analyze the ESI found on the drives. Without any transparency into the contents of the drives, the court could not weigh the benefits of the discovery against the alleged burdens of preservation. The court was thus left to speculate about the nature of the ESI on the drives, reasoning that it went to the heart of plaintiffs’ class action claims. As the district court observed, the firm may very well have obtained the relief it requested had it engaged in “good faith negotiations” with the plaintiffs over the preservation of the drives.

The Lesson for 2013: The Pippins decision reinforces a common refrain that parties seeking the protection of proportionality principles must engage in reasonable, cooperative discovery conduct. Staking out uncooperative positions in the name of zealous advocacy stands in sharp contrast to proportionality standards and the cost cutting mandate of Rule 1. Moreover, such a tactic may very well foreclose proportionality considerations, just as it did in Pippins.

**Another Must-Read Case: Kleen Products LLC v. Packaging Corp. of America (N.D. Ill. Sept. 28, 2012)

Conclusion

There were any number of other significant cases from 2012 that could have made this list.  We invite you to share your favorites in the comments section or contact us directly with your feedback.

December Symantec SharePoint Governance Twitter Chat

Thursday, December 13th, 2012

Join hashtag #IGChat and learn about SharePoint governance and creating effective governance plans

Over the years, SharePoint has become a favorite among organizations as a place to share and manage content. As SharePoint adoption increases – storage, performance and on-going maintenance become major challenges, and SharePoint governance becomes essential. Archiving and eDiscovery solutions provide a key part in any effective and lasting governance strategy for SharePoint.  

In a 2012 survey conducted by Osterman research, the results showed that 39 percent of all SharePoint implementations still don’t have a governance plan. This is due to the fact that implementing governance plans can be difficult.

During this Twitter Chat we will discuss the reasons why organizations need SharePoint governance and the role of archiving and eDiscovery in governance plans. Please join Symantec’s archiving/eDiscovery and SharePoint experts, Dave Scott (@DScottyt) and Rob Mossi (@RMossi24) next Tuesday, December 18 at 10 am PT to chat.

Dave Scott: Dave Scott is a Group Product Manager at Symantec specializing in social media and SharePoint archiving and eDiscovery. He has contributed articles to a number of leading industry publications and is a frequent contributor to Connect.symantec.com. 

Rob Mossi: Rob Mossi is a Sr. Product Marketing Manager with Symantec’s Enterprise Vault product team. With a focus on SharePoint, Rob actively participates in SharePoint archiving and information governance thought leadership activities, including research, conferences and social media. 

 Twitter Chat: SharePoint Governance #IGChat

 Date: Tuesday, December 18, 2012

 Time: 10 am PT

 Length: 1 hour

 Where: Twitter – follow the hashtag #IGChat

 Moderator: Symantec’s Dave Scott (@DScottyt)

What Abraham Lincoln Teaches about Defensible Deletion of ESI

Monday, November 19th, 2012

The reviews are in and movie critics are universally acclaiming Lincoln, the most recent Hollywood rendition regarding the sixteenth president of the United States. While viewers may or may not enjoy the movie, the focus on Abraham Lincoln brings to mind a rather key insight for organizations seeking to strengthen their defensible deletion process.

Lincoln has long been admired for his astute handling of the U.S. Civil War and for his inventive genius (he remains the only U.S. President who patented an invention). Nevertheless, it is Lincoln’s magnanimous, yet shrewd treatment of his rivals that provides the key lesson for organizations today. With a strategy that inexplicably escapes many organizations, Lincoln intelligently organized his documents and other materials so that he could timely retrieve them to help keep his political enemies in check.

This strategy was particularly successful with his Secretary of the Treasury, Salmon Chase, who constantly undermined Lincoln in an effort to bolster his own presidential aspirations. To blunt the effect of Chase’s treachery, Lincoln successfully wielded the weapon of information: Chase’s letters to Lincoln that were filled with problematic admissions. Doris Kearns Goodwin chronicled in her Pulitzer Prize winning book, Team of Rivals, how Lincoln always seemed to access that information at a moment’s notice to save him from Chase’s duplicity.

Lincoln’s tactics reinforce the value of retaining and retrieving important information in a time of need. Lacking the organizational and technological capacity to do so may prevent companies from pulling up information at a crucial moment, be it for business, legal or regulatory purposes. For this and many other reasons, industry experts are recommending that organizations implement a defensible deletion strategy.

Defensible Deletion Requires Deletion                    

Such a strategy could have some success if it is powered by the latest in effective retention technologies such as data classification and automated legal hold. Such innovations will better enable organizations to segregate and preserve business critical ESI.

And yet, it is not enough to just adopt the preservation side of this strategy, for the heart of defensible deletion requires just that – deleting large classes of superfluous, duplicative and harmful data – if its benefits are ever to be realized. Companies that fail to delete such ESI will likely never come off conqueror in the “battle of the data bulge.” Indeed, such a growing waistline of data is problematic for three reasons. First, it can place undue pressure on an organization’s storage infrastructure and needlessly increase the cost of data retention. It can also result in higher eDiscovery costs as the organization is forced to review and analyze all of that ESI largesse. Finally, a potentially fatal risk of producing harmful materials – kept beyond the time required by law – in eDiscovery will unnecessarily increase. All of which could have been obviated had the enterprise observed the rule of “good corporate housekeeping” by eliminating ESI in a manner approved by courts and the rules makers.

For organizations willing to get rid of their digital clutter, defensible deletion offers just what they need so as to reduce the costs and risks of bloated ESI retention. Doing so will help companies make better use that information so, like Honest Abe, they can stave off troublesome challenges threatening the enterprise.

Where There’s Smoke There’s Fire: Powering eDiscovery with Data Loss Prevention

Monday, November 12th, 2012

New technologies are being repurposed for Early Case Assessment (ECA) in this ever-changing global economy chockfull of intellectual property theft and cybertheft. These increasingly hot issues are now compelling lawyers to become savvier about how the technologies they use to identify IP theft and related issues in eDiscovery. One of the more useful, but often overlooked tools in this regard is Data Loss Prevention (DLP) technology. Traditionally a data breach and security tool, DLP has emerged as yet another tool in the Litigator’s Tool Belt™ that can be applied in eDiscovery.

DLP technology utilizes Vector Machine Learning (VML) to detect intellectual property, such as product designs, source code and trademarked language that are deemed proprietary and confidential. This technology eliminates the need for developing laborious keyword-based policies or fingerprinting documents. While a corporation can certainly customize these policies, there are off the shelf materials that make the technology easy to deploy.

An exemplary use case that spotlights how DLP could have been deployed in the eDiscovery context is the case of E.I. Du Pont de Nemours v. Kolon Industries. In DuPont, a jury issued a $919 million verdict after finding that the defendant manufacturer stole critical elements of the formula for Kevlar, a closely guarded and highly profitable DuPont trade secret. Despite the measures that were taken to protect the trade secret, a former DuPont consultant successfully copied key information relating to Kevlar on to a CD that was later disseminated to the manufacturer’s executives. All of this came to light in the recently unsealed criminal indictments the U.S. Department of Justice obtained against the manufacturer and several of its executives.

Perhaps all of this could have been avoided had a DLP tool been deployed. A properly implemented DLP solution in the DuPont case might have detected the misappropriation that occurred and perhaps prompted an internal investigation. At the very least, DLP could possibly have mitigated the harmful effects of the trade secret theft. DLP technology could potentially have detected the departure/copying of proprietary information and any other suspicious behavior regarding sensitive IP.

As the DuPont case teaches, DLP can be utilized to detect IP theft and data breaches. In addition, it can act as an early case assessment (ECA) tool for lawyers in both civil and criminal actions. With data breaches, where there is smoke (breach) there is generally fire (litigation). A DLP incident report can be used as a basis for an investigation, and essentially reverse engineer the ECA process with hard evidence underlying the data breach. Thus, instead of beginning an investigation with a hunch or tangential lead, DLP gives hard facts to lawyers, and ultimately serves as a roadmap for effective legal hold implementation for the communications of custodians. Instead of discovering data breaches during the discovery process, DLP allows lawyers to start with this information, making the entire matter more efficient and targeted.

From an information governance point of view, DLP also has a relationship with the left proactive side of the Electronic Discovery Reference Model. The DLP technology can also be repurposed as Data Classification Services for automated document retention. The policy and technology combination of DCS/DLP speak to each other in harmony to accomplish appropriate document retention as well as breach prevention and notification. It follows that there would be similar identifiers for both policy consoles in DCS/DLP, and that these indicators enable the technology to make intelligent decisions.

Given this backdrop, it behooves both firm lawyers and corporate counsel to consider getting up to speed on the capabilities of DLP tools. The benefits DLP offers in eDiscovery are too important to be ignored.

Breaking News: Recusal Motion in Da Silva Moore Case Denied

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

In what might be characterized as the most anticipated ruling in the eDiscovery world over the past several months, the district court in Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe today denied the plaintiffs’ motion to recuse the Honorable Andrew Peck as the assigned magistrate to that action. In rejecting the plaintiffs’ recusal request, United States District Court Judge Andrew Carter held that “Judge Peck’s decision accepting computer-assisted review, reached upon consideration of the applicable law, was not influenced by bias, nor did it create any appearance of bias.”

Judge Carter’s decision is particularly significant as it leaves undisturbed Judge Peck’s orders regarding the use of predictive coding and his declaration that computer-assisted review in eDiscovery is “acceptable in appropriate cases.” Moreover, Judge Carter gave another judicial imprimatur to predictive coding with his determination that it “does not inherently favor one party over the other in this case.”

With today’s ruling, Judge Carter has perhaps finally brought to a close the contentious sideshow that nearly overshadowed the first known case involving the use of predictive coding in eDiscovery. With its potential to reduce the costs and delays associated with the review of ESI, predictive coding holds incredible promise for the future of eDiscovery.